Descendants of William Wiley

 

 

Generation No. 1

 

1. WILLIAM1 WILEY died Abt. 1783. He married UNKNOWN. She died Abt. 1792.

 

Notes for WILLIAM WILEY:

Note:

 

Maury County, TN Will Book C1-221

Re: National Banner and Nashville Whig, Sep 2, 1830.

John Wiley was the son of Robert Wiley, who was born about 1755 in North Carolina, and who died in Maury County before Jan 24, 1824 when his will, dated Aug 31, 1821 was recorded. This will names wife Sarah, children Joh, Thomas, William, Moses, Andrew, Polly, Margaret, Alexander and Sarah Thompson. Sarah Wiley, wife of Robert Wiley, deceased Aug 10, 1830 at the age of 73 years.

 

Re: Guilford County, NC Deed Books 1-304, 2-229, 5-416.

In Guilford County, NC in 1775, William Wiley sells 300 acres on Beaver creek to his son Robert Wiley, in 1783 Mary Wiley, and William Wiley heirs executors of William Wiley deceased sell 242 acres on a fork of the West Allamance and in 1792 William Wiley and Robert Wiley sell 200 acres of North Allamance Creek, suggesting that Robert's father William died about 1783 and his mother died about 1792.

 

GUILFORD COUNTY, DEED BOOK TWO

1779 - 1784

Page 339, 9 August 1783, Marey Wiley, Robert Wiley & William Wiley, heirs and executors of Wm Wiley deceased, living in the Settlement of Alamance in Guilford to Sampson Stuart of Guilford, one hundred pounds, two hundred and forty two acres on the north side of the north fork of great Alamance, begin at a stake at John Wiley's corner, E51 1/4 ch. to a stake, S45 ch. to a stake on the bank of afrsd creek, up creek to John Wiley's corner, N to the first station.

Signed Mary (X) Wiley, Robert Wiley, Wm: Wiley; witness; John Wiley, Thos. Wiley; acknowledged August Court 1783.

Child of WILLIAM WILEY and UNKNOWN is:

2. i. ROBERT WILEY2 SR., b. Abt. 1755, North Carolina; d. 1824, Maury County Tennessee.

 

 

Generation No. 2

 

2. ROBERT WILEY2 SR. (WILLIAM1 WILEY) was born Abt. 1755 in North Carolina, and died 1824 in Maury County Tennessee. He married SARAH. She was born Abt. 1757, and died Aug 10, 1830 in Maury County Tennessee.

 

Notes for ROBERT WILEY SR.:

Robert S. (Wiley) Wylie Sr. is listed in 1850 Hickman County Tennessee Census, age 65, born North Carolina

in 1785.

 

According to the 1790 census of South Carolina the family moved from North Carolina to South Carolina between 1785 and 1790.

 

The 1790 census of SC lists a Robert Wiley in York Co.

Camden District, York County

Column 3: Wyly, Robert 1m 16+, 5m 16-, 1 f, 0 slaves.

 

Note:

On this same page appears a David Wiley (1 m 16+ and 1 f16 + and 3 slaves). Also, there are several families of Farris living near Robert. You will remember that two of Robert's sons were married to Farrises.

Additionally, on column 2 of this same page is a John Sellers. He may or may not be the John Sellers of later Maury Co., Tenn. at whose estate sale your Robert Wiley was a purchaser (1826) (Probably this was Robert S. Not Robert Sr.,)"

 

Look for more information in York co., SC records on Robert Wiley.

Children of ROBERT SR. and SARAH are:

i. JOHN3 WILEY, b. Mar 01, 1781; d. Feb 24, 1857, Maury County Tennessee.

 

More About JOHN WILEY:

Burial: Jones Presby. Church Cem, on Cathey's Creek

 

ii. THOMAS WILEY.

 

Notes for THOMAS WILEY:

From Guilford County Estate Records 1778-1933 (North Carolina)

Folder: Eli Wiley - 1829

Heirs at law listed on a summons:

 

Thomas Wiley

Elizabeth Ann Wiley

Hugh F. Wiley

Hanson Wiley

Euphenia Wiley

Polly Wiley

Nancy Wiley

Abby Wiley (all under age of 20 in 1831 - Guardian is Mary Wiley

 

I believe that Polly Wylie is Mary Mayben Wiley who married Willaim Suits, Jan 16, 1838

and euphenia Wiley married Henry Suits, Oct 7, 1839.

 

 

 

3. iii. ROBERT S. WILEY, b. 1785, North Carolina; d. 1824, Jones Presby. Church Cem, on Cathey's Creek.

iv. WILLIAM WILEY.

v. MOSES WILEY, m. ANNA FARIS, Jul 22, 1817, Maury City, Tennessee.

 

Notes for MOSES WILEY:

Confederate Soldiers & Patriots of Maury County, Tennessee

 

It would be a more obvious connection that his parents were

Alexander F. Wiley and Sally Farris - considering his brothers

and sisters. Look to the Census for a result.

 

There is no doubt that the following:

William Hill Wylie is in our family line. I have not been able to make a

positive connection at this time. However, I will enter the data I have.

(I think there are some errors of memory in this presentation as the

facts cast some of this in doubt.)

 

WILLIAM HILL WYLIE --- Company D, 9th Tennessee Cavalry Bn.

Born 22 June 1842 in Hickman county; died 19 April 1932, buried at Sheboss;

son of Moses and Susan Tatum Wiley. He married Virginia Caroline Scott,

daughter of James and Elizabeth Scott.

 

Children of soldier:

1. Susan, born about 1869, married Master Pinklin Odd Simmons.

2. William M., born 1871.

3. Solomon T., born about 1873.

4. Samuel A., born about 1875.

5. Monroe W., born aobut 1877.

6. Mary F., married Jess Clark.

7. Arena, married James Blocker

8. G. W.

9. Richard.

 

Brothers and sisters of soldier:

1. Mary wiley, married Samuel Skipper.

2. Celly Wiley, married Sam Fuller.

3. John Wiley, married Susan Farris.

 

vi. ANDREW M. WILEY, b. 1798, South Carolina.

 

Notes for ANDREW M. WILEY:

Maury County Tennessee, Chancery Coury Records 1810-1860

In the Matter of CHAPPELL vs. KITTRELL, 1856.

 

Andrew M. Wiley deposition taken in Perry County, age 59, 8 Sept, 1857, before Nepthali Tracy, J.P. in Perry County: lived on Catheys Creek from about 1811 to 1852...knew Alexander Cathey the father-in-law of George A. Kennedy...lived in immediate neighborhood...was present at the raising of Thomas Oliphant's house on Alexander Cathey land...James Baxter present at house raising also..."the house built by Oliphant when he sunk the tanyard."

 

4. vii. ALEXANDER F. WILEY, b. 1790, South Carolina; d. 1855.

viii. POLLY WILEY.

ix. MARGARET WILEY.

5. x. SARAH (THOMPSON) WILEY, b. 1793.

 

 

Generation No. 3

 

3. ROBERT S.3 WILEY (ROBERT WILEY2 SR., WILLIAM1 WILEY) was born 1785 in North Carolina, and died 1824 in Jones Presby. Church Cem, on Cathey's Creek. He married EASTER (ESTHER).

 

Notes for ROBERT S. WILEY:

1. I have surveyed for Robert S. Wiley 200 acres on head of Blue Buck Creek range 4 Section 5&6, beginning on a dogwood 92 1/2 poles west of the southeast corner of an occupant entry In the name of Joshua Hill runs from thence west with the same 23 poles to a post oak his corner thence north with the same 57 poles to a white oak his corner thence west 1094 poles to two dogwoods on the bluff thence south 191 1/3 poles to a stake thence east 72 poles to a stake thence north 54 1/3 poles to a stake thence east 144 poles to stake with two black oaks and two dog wood pointers thence north 80 poles to the beginning. Surveyed the 14 of August 1840. (signed) Geo. Peery C.S. (country Surveyor) SCC: John Skipper, W.H. ________(blank) (Chain Carrier)

 

From this we know that Robert S. Wiley had begun the process of obtaining a state grant/Purchase grant for this land.

 

The very earliest Wylie reference in this data is John Wiley in 1813. No tie in data yet.

 

A HISTORY OF HICKMAN COUNTY TENNESSEE

By W. Jerome D. Spence and David L. Spence

Robert Wiley came to Blue Buck Creek in 1817 and located at the Alson Shelby place, where he lived until his death, in 1862. (This date is not correct, Cemetery records show 1824) He was drowned in the creek where the water was not more than one foot deep. He was one of the first settlers of this section, settling here when it was still in the Indian country. He assisted in the cutting away of the cane in this valley and in the clearing of the first lands on this creek. This was but a short distance inside the Indian country, as the line, the Natchez Trace, ran along the ridge at the head of the creek. Often friendly Indians would visit the frontier settlements here. Robert Wiley was the father of Moses, Andrew and John Wiley. Andrew Wiley had a stillhouse from 1861 to 1863 above Crawford's house, in a hollow, north of the Centerville and Columbia road, in the First District.

 

Children of ROBERT WILEY and EASTER (ESTHER) are:

i. MOSES4 WILEY.

6. ii. ANDREW H. WILEY, b. 1815, Born in Kentucky.

iii. JOHN WILEY.

iv. UNKNOWN WILEY, m. SAMUEL PRUETT.

v. MARY WILEY.

vi. MARGARET WILEY, m. ALEXANDER GREEN, 1866; b. Non Resident of Hickman County Tennessee.

 

 

4. ALEXANDER F.3 WILEY (ROBERT WILEY2 SR., WILLIAM1 WILEY) was born 1790 in South Carolina, and died 1855. He married SALLY FARIS 1822. She was born 1797.

 

Notes for ALEXANDER F. WILEY:

Alexander F. (Wiley) Wylie

From the 1820 census of Maury County, we have an estimated if Alexander's age: 26-45, and approximation of birth date 1775-1794. this is assuming that the older man and woman in the household are Alexander's parents, Robert and Sarah.

 

The 1830 census of Maury, P. 384, lists Alexaner as:

Wiley Alexander 010001-20001 (Alexander being 30-40, born ca 1790-1800.

 

WAR OF 1812 SOLDIERS OF MAURY COUNTY, TENNESSEE

ALEXANDER F. WILEY

Born 1790, buried in Harder Cemetery, Cedar Creek, Perry County, Tenn. Served as private in Capt. Peter Searcy's Company, Col Amos Pipkin's Regiment from 20 June 1814 to 20 Dec 1814 as substitute for John Wiley. Also served in Capt. John Gordon Company, 24 Sept. 1813 and discharged 10 May 1814. He was son of Robert Wiley. He married 1822 to Sally Farris, born 1797

 

HARDER CEMETERY, PERRY COUNTY TENNESSEE

Wiley, Alexander F., 1790-1855, Military marker, "Tennessee Pvt., Capt Gordons Co. War of 1812"

(This is in front of a stone cairn on which is carved Alex Wiley)

 

 

(Genealogy reference note for future reference)

NOT THIS ALEXANDER F WYLIE

(The marriage records of Madison Co. Kentucky 1782-1844 show,)

(Alexander Wylie married Hannah Patterson Jan 19, 1797.)

 

 

More About ALEXANDER F. WILEY:

Burial: Harder Cem., Cedar Creek, Perry Co. Tenn

Children of ALEXANDER WILEY and SALLY FARIS are:

i. JOHN4 WILEY.

7. ii. CALEB WILEY, b. 1826.

iii. WILLIAM WILEY.

iv. JANE WILEY.

v. SARAH WILEY.

vi. MARY LOU ANN WILEY.

 

 

5. SARAH (THOMPSON)3 WILEY (ROBERT WILEY2 SR., WILLIAM1 WILEY) was born 1793.

 

Notes for SARAH (THOMPSON) WILEY:

Reference: Sarah Wiley

The 1850 Census at #62 indicated no Husband living in the family.

Children of SARAH (THOMPSON) WILEY are:

i. JOHN A.4 WILEY, b. Abt. 1833.

ii. WILLIAM WILEY, b. Abt. 1836.

iii. MARY F. WILEY, b. Abt. 1838.

iv. LOUISA M. WILEY, b. Abt. 1842.

v. JACOB A. WILEY, b. Abt. 1844.

 

 

Generation No. 4

 

6. ANDREW H.4 WILEY (ROBERT S.3, ROBERT WILEY2 SR., WILLIAM1 WILEY) was born 1815 in Born in Kentucky. He married ELIZABETH P. CRAWFORD Sep 26, 1837 in Maury County Tennessee, daughter of ROBERT A. CRAWFORD. She was born Abt. 1821 in South Carolina.

 

Notes for ANDREW H. WILEY:

In 1850 the family is living in Lewis County, Tennessee

1850 Census of Lewis country, Tenn.

District#1, p. 824, #320

Wiley, Andrew H. 32 farmer born Kentucky

(In the 1860 Census Andrew H. Wiley lists his Occupation as Distiller, born in Kentucky)

(In the 1850 Census Andrew H. Wiley lists his Occupation as farmer, born in Kentucky)

Elizabeth 29 born S. Carolina

Sarah J. 8 born Tenn

Crawford, Robert A. 70 farmer born S. Carolina

 

I found Andrew H. Wylie in the International Genealogical Index v5.0.

They are in error when they show his birth in Maury, Tennessee and

date as 1812.

Elizabeth Crawford is also show in error as to born in Maury, Tennessee.

 

 

Children of ANDREW WILEY and ELIZABETH CRAWFORD are:

8. i. ANDREW THOMAS5 WILEY, b. Nov 1855, Lewis County Tennessee.

ii. SARAH J. WILEY, b. Abt. 1842.

 

 

7. CALEB4 WILEY (ALEXANDER F.3, ROBERT WILEY2 SR., WILLIAM1 WILEY) was born 1826. He married CATHARINE. She was born 1826.

 

Notes for CALEB WILEY:

See 1850 Perry County Tennessee Census #63

Children of CALEB WILEY and CATHARINE are:

i. MARTHA J.5 WILEY, b. 1845.

ii. SUSAN E. WILEY, b. Abt. 1847.

iii. THOMAS F. WILEY, b. Abt. 1849.

iv. ELIZABETH WILEY.

 

 

Generation No. 5

 

8. ANDREW THOMAS5 WILEY (ANDREW H.4, ROBERT S.3, ROBERT WILEY2 SR., WILLIAM1 WILEY) was born Nov 1855 in Lewis County Tennessee. He married ANNAH E. JOHNSON Nov 27, 1877 in Hickman County Tennessee, daughter of LANTY JOHNSTON and EMILINE MERRITT. She was born Dec 20, 1857 in Hickman County Tennessee, and died Nov 10, 1918.

 

Notes for ANDREW THOMAS WILEY:

WYLIE AND WILEY

This NAME SWAP was common because very few people could read and write,

the person taking information would determine the spelling.

 

1. Thomas Wiley and his wife Anie E., with their birth dates and list of children are none other than

Thomas Wylie and Annah E. Johnson.

Census for Lewis County, Tennessee

District #3, Enumeration district 61, sheet 10

Household 230.

 

From talking with Dad, Lanty H. Wylie Sr., I know that my Grandparents were named

Thomas Andrew Wiley and Annah E. Johnson

Their children are listed in the census as:

Walter Dutch Wylie

Dentel Wylie

Eta M. Wylie

Salley Wylie

Lanty Wylie (This is Lanty Hill Wylie Sr.)

Mary Wylie

Maime A. Wylie

 

So: From the list of children of Thomas and Annah, plus the birth dates, there can be no doubt as to the connection to the present Wylie family.

 

2. In 1910 the family is living in Perry County, Tenn.

Soundex to 1900 Census of Tennessee, Perry County, ED 193, Sheet 4

Wiley, Andy T. white, age 54

Anna wife age 52

Son Lantie son 19

 

 

3. By 1920 Anna has died and Andy T. Wiley is living in a son-in-law's home:

Soundex to 1920 Census of Tennessee

 

Lewis County, ED 102, sheet 10

Wiley, Thomas A. White 65, Tenn.

enumerated with Lyle, Harvey, as father-in-law.

 

4. Tennessee Death Certificates

1918, Roll 79, vol. 15 #118, Decatur County, #118

(There are Tennessee records that show Thomas Andrew Wiley and Thomas

Andrew Wylie. Some Tennessee records show A.T. Wylie - however dates

of birth, death, spouse, children and home place show these to be the

same person.)

 

Wiley, Ana E., Female, white, married, died 10 November 1918

Born October 10, 1858, age 60, born Hickman Co., Tenn:

Father Lanta Johnston, born Tenn. (Should have been spelled Lanty)

Mother Susan Williams, born Tenn.

Buried November 1918, Parson, Tennessee.

The doctor that signed her death certificate was A.S. Hufstedler. This is where Clyde H. Wylie got his middle

name of Hufstedler.

 

5. 6. Marriage Records.

The marriage of Thomas A. Wylie to Annah E. Johnson took place in Hickman County, Tenn, in 1877.

Hickman Co., Tenn.

Marriages, book 3, p. 219

Thomas A. Wiley to Annah E. Johnson

27 November 1877

Bondsman, J.F. McCoy

Marriage solemnized 28, November 1877, by D.N. Walker, J.P.

 

6. Parsons Cemetery:

E., 12/20/1857-11/10/1918, "Wife of A. T. Wylie" (Note: in 1991 there were flowers matching those on this grave at a spot 2 feet north of it.)

T., No dates.

(As you can see, the Grave is marked Wylie, but Marriage and Death records show Wiley. )

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

More About ANDREW THOMAS WILEY:

Burial: Parson, Perry, Tennessee

 

Notes for ANNAH E. JOHNSON:

The Death Certificate for Anna E. (Johnson) Wiley

shows her birth day to be October 10, 1858.

Her tomb stone shows her birth day to be

December 20, 1857

 

In the 1900 Census of Lewis County, Tennessee.

Age 42, married 23 years, had 12 children with 7 living.

 

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------

 

Found in Humboldt County, Rose Hill Cemetery

 

Anna Johnson Merritt

Bn. 1862 D. 1926

 

I cannot make a family connection.

 

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

 

More About ANNAH E. JOHNSON:

Burial: Nov 11, 1918, Parson, Decatur County, Tennessee

Children of ANDREW WILEY and ANNAH JOHNSON are:

9. i. WALTER L. (DUTCH)6 WYLIE, b. Mar 1878.

ii. DENTEL WYLIE, b. Aug 1880.

iii. ETA M. WYLIE, b. Feb 1882.

10. iv. SALLIE WYLIE, b. Apr 03, 1886; d. May 28, 1964.

11. v. LANTY HILL WYLIE SR, b. Aug 11, 1890, Hoenwald, Lewis County, Tennessee; d. Mar 05, 1964, Kilbourne, Louisiana.

12. vi. MARY M. WYLIE, b. May 1893; d. 1956.

vii. MAIME A WYLIE, b. Jun 1899.

 

 

Generation No. 6

 

9. WALTER L. (DUTCH)6 WYLIE (ANDREW THOMAS5 WILEY, ANDREW H.4, ROBERT S.3, ROBERT WILEY2 SR., WILLIAM1 WILEY) was born Mar 1878. He married MARTHA J..

 

Notes for WALTER L. (DUTCH) WYLIE:

Soundex of 1910 Census of Tennessee

Hickman County, ED 50, sheet 8.

Wyly, Dutch M. White 29

Martha J. Wife 29

Mattie daughter 6

Elvis son 4

Children of WALTER WYLIE and MARTHA J. are:

i. MATTIE7 WYLIE.

ii. ELVIS WYLIE.

 

 

10. SALLIE6 WYLIE (ANDREW THOMAS5 WILEY, ANDREW H.4, ROBERT S.3, ROBERT WILEY2 SR., WILLIAM1 WILEY) was born Apr 03, 1886, and died May 28, 1964. She married KELLY MARSHALL, son of KELLY MARSHALL and MARGARET BARNETT. He was born Mar 31, 1885, and died Sep 05, 1973.

 

More About SALLIE WYLIE:

Burial: Parsons, Decatur, Tennessee

 

More About KELLY MARSHALL:

Burial: Parsons, Decatur, Tennessee

Children of SALLIE WYLIE and KELLY MARSHALL are:

i. LOUISE7 MARSHALL, b. 1908; d. 1978; m. LEE ANDREW TYLER; b. 1906; d. 1981.

 

More About LOUISE MARSHALL:

Burial: Parsons, Decatur, Tennessee

 

ii. THOMAS MARSHALL, b. May 20, 1922; m. HARLINE DEAN; b. May 11, 1927, Missouri.

iii. HERBERT MARSHALL, b. May 11, 1914; d. Jan 16, 1995; m. MABLE; b. Jun 25, 1926.

iv. MARIE MARSHALL, b. Jan 26, 1912; d. Jan 18, 1998; m. (1) CARL DAVIS; m. (2) HARRISON W. DANIEL; b. Feb 04, 1890; d. May 30, 1957.

 

More About MARIE MARSHALL:

Burial: Parsons Cemetery, Decatur County, Tennessee

 

 

11. LANTY HILL WYLIE6 SR (ANDREW THOMAS5 WILEY, ANDREW H.4, ROBERT S.3, ROBERT WILEY2 SR., WILLIAM1 WILEY) was born Aug 11, 1890 in Hoenwald, Lewis County, Tennessee, and died Mar 05, 1964 in Kilbourne, Louisiana. He married (1) FANNY GRACE CUNNINGHAM, daughter of CHARLEY CUNNINGHAM and LOUISA DUFF. She was born Apr 03, 1896, and died Mar 17, 1928 in Lobville, Perry, Tennessee. He married (2) ARTIE JAMES 1909. He married (3) LUCILE GENTRY 1932 in Mississippi, daughter of JOHN SR. and AGNES JERNIGAN. She was born Mar 08, 1901 in Putman County Tennessee, and died Jun 24, 1990 in Oak Grove, Nursing Home, Louisiana.

 

Notes for LANTY HILL WYLIE SR:

My father, Lanty Hill Wylie Sr., was married to Artie James in 1909, when Dad was about sixteen years old. They divorced six months later. My Dad then married Fanny Grace Cunningham and she bore him Fred E. Wylie, Grady E. Wylie, Clyde H. Wylie, Fanny Mae Wylie and Cloys Paul Wylie. Fanny Grace Cunningham died in 1928 with some form of child bed fever. Her religious beliefs and her family support for those beliefs sped her untimely death.

 

My first childhood memories were of my Mother and half-sister Hazel. Then I remember Dad.

He did not have much time to spend with me when I was a small child, but as I got older we worked the

farm together. I was the youngest. When I started working the farm with Dad, all my brothers were married and gone.

 

Dad was born and raised in Tennessee. He quit school in the Third Grade and started working in a

sawmill as the water boy. Dad stayed with the sawmill and learned the blacksmith trade. Most repairs and

tools were made for the sawmill, by the blacksmith.

 

After his marriage to Artie James failed there were tensions between Dad and his Mother and Father. I never

heard my Dad say one word about his family. If Mother knew, she did not say anything to me.

 

I think that Dad's marriage to Fanny Grace Cunningham brought out the best in him. From the information I

have been able to gather, he was a devoted family man.

 

When Fanny Grace Cunningham died, after the birth of Fanny Mae, Dad started making whiskey in a cave

near where he lived in Tennessee. He was also a Deputy Sheriff at the time.

 

Dad had my 4 brothers and Fanny Mae to take care of, by himself. When the town elders got wind of Dad's

part time job of making whiskey, they proceded to initiate action to take his children away. Dad found out of

this and taking all but Fanny Mae, went to Arkansas and then to Mississippi. Fanny Mae was left in the care of

her mother's sister and her husband. Jim D. Weatherly. The understanding was that Dad would never ask for

Fanny Mae.

 

Dad met my Mother in Mississippi and they married.

 

When I was 1 year old, we set out for Arkansas. There was land to homestead, just clear and farm the land and it was yours.

 

The log cabin in Arkansas is my first memory.

 

When I was 4 years old, Dad sold out the farm in Arkansas and we moved to Louisiana.

 

He farmed in West Carroll Parish until his death.

 

I only have fond memories of my childhood and my parents. We did not have any material things, to speak of,

but they treated me well and we all shared of what we had.

Lanty H. Wylie Jr.

 

 

More About LANTY HILL WYLIE SR:

Burial: Mar 07, 1964, Kilbourne, Cemetery, Louisiana

 

More About FANNY GRACE CUNNINGHAM:

Burial: Mar 18, 1928, Lobville, Tennessee at Leeper Cemetery

 

Notes for ARTIE JAMES:

Married to Lanty Hill Wylie Sr., in 1909,

Divorced 9 months later.

No children.

 

Notes for LUCILE GENTRY:

Mother and Dad met at a dance party and the next day Mother left her husband Sam C. Parker, took Hazel her daughter and moved in with my Dad and his four sons. My Mother had married Parker February 12, 1920.

 

After my Mother's divorce from Parker was granted, she married my Dad in Benoit, Bolivar County, Mississippi by a Justice of the Peace May 4, 1932. They lived on Sam Speaks plantation near Benoit Mississippi.

 

When Dad met my Mother, Dora Lucile (Gentry) Parker she was married to a Mr. Sam C. Parker and had one child, Hazel. Hazel was five years old at this time. Mr. Parker was fifteen years older than my Mother. Mother said that she was encouraged to marry him by her friends, but she never loved Parker. Parker was a sharecropper and I think it was working Mother to death in the cotton fields. From photographs of Mother while she was married to Parker, she looked withdrawn and unhappy. Looking back, I think Dad told Mother that she would never have to work in the fields and she didn't, after her marriage to my father.

 

Hazel never got over her Mother leaving her Father (Parker). Later Mother told Patricia, my wife, that it was a terrible thing to leave someone (Parker) that cared as much about her as he did.

 

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

 

Wednesday, July 4, 1990 West Carroll Gazette

 

Mrs. Lucile Wylie

Services for Mrs. Lucile Wylie, 89, were held Wednesday, June 27, at 11 a.m. at Kilbourne Baptist Church with the Reverend Jim Herrington officiating.

Interment followed in Kilbourne Cemetery for Mrs. Wylie who passed away Sunday, June 24 in Oak Grove. Services were under the direction of Cox Funeral Home of Oak Grove.

Survivors include three sons, Clyde H. Wylie, of Alexandria; Paul Wylie, of DeQuincy; and Lanty H. Wylie Jr., of Hurst, Texas; three daughters, Hazel Guest, of Marrietta, Ga.; Fannie Mae Utley, of Camden, Tenn.; and Mary Lee Wylie, of Houston, Texas ; one brother, John Gentry, of Marthaville; 34 grandchildren; 50 great grandchildren; and 12 great great grandchildren.

Pallbearers were Eddie Allen, Ronnie Hubbard, Dennis Seamans, James Fuller, David Stevens and John West.

 

 

 

More About LUCILE GENTRY:

Burial: Jun 27, 1990, Kilbourne, West Carroll Parish, Louisiana

Children of LANTY SR and FANNY CUNNINGHAM are:

13. i. FRED E7 WYLIE, b. Feb 13, 1914; d. Jul 12, 1963, Wyoming.

14. ii. GRADY ELTON WYLIE, b. Mar 31, 1916; d. Jul 16, 1977, Monroe, Louisiana.

15. iii. CLYDE H WYLIE, b. Dec 16, 1918; d. Aug 25, 1997, Alexandria, Louisiana.

16. iv. C PAUL WYLIE, b. Jul 24, 1922, Parson, Decatur County, Tennessee.

17. v. FANNIE MAE WYLIE, b. Nov 11, 1927, Parsons, Decatur, Tennessee.

 

Children of LANTY SR and LUCILE GENTRY are:

18. vi. LANTY H WYLIE7 JR, b. Nov 06, 1932, Benoit, Bolivar County, Mississippi.

19. vii. MARY LEE WYLIE, b. Feb 08, 1947, Kilbourne, West Carroll Parish, Louisiana.

 

 

12. MARY M.6 WYLIE (ANDREW THOMAS5 WILEY, ANDREW H.4, ROBERT S.3, ROBERT WILEY2 SR., WILLIAM1 WILEY) was born May 1893, and died 1956. She married JERRY W. MARSHALL. He was born 1890, and died 1953.

Children of MARY WYLIE and JERRY MARSHALL are:

i. L. H.7 MARSHALL.

ii. IDA M. MARSHALL, b. Feb 23, 1917; d. Feb 23, 1985; m. LOYD M. COMER; b. Dec 04, 1915; d. Feb 03, 1992.

 

More About IDA M. MARSHALL:

Burial: Parsons Cemetery, Decatur County, Tennessee

 

More About LOYD M. COMER:

Burial: Parsons Cemetery, Decatur County, Tennessee

 

iii. K. Z. MARSHALL, b. Oct 24, 1921; d. May 26, 1964.

 

Notes for K. Z. MARSHALL:

K. Z. Marshall Military Marker.

"Tennessee Sgt. U.S. Army WW2.

 

More About K. Z. MARSHALL:

Burial: Parsons Cemetery, Decatur County, Tennessee

 

iv. JOHNNIE SUE MARSHALL, b. 1926; d. 1999; m. GRIER.

 

 

Generation No. 7

 

13. FRED E7 WYLIE (LANTY HILL WYLIE6 SR, ANDREW THOMAS5 WILEY, ANDREW H.4, ROBERT S.3, ROBERT WILEY2 SR., WILLIAM1 WILEY) was born Feb 13, 1914, and died Jul 12, 1963 in Wyoming. He married (1) HELEN JENKINS. He married (2) ADA SMITH, daughter of DUNCAN JR. and CATHERINE BUCKNER. She was born Jun 26, 1914. He married (3) BEULAH GOODWIN 1951.

 

More About FRED E WYLIE:

Burial: Kilbourne, West Carroll Parish, Louisiana

 

More About BEULAH GOODWIN:

Burial: Kilbourne, West Carroll Parish, Louisiana

Children of FRED WYLIE and HELEN JENKINS are:

i. CAROLYN8 WYLIE, b. 1942; m. (1) GEORGE MORTON; m. (2) PETE HONEYCUT.

 

Notes for CAROLYN WYLIE:

Carolyn Wylie (Morton) (Honeycutt)

5547 Mount Pleasant Church Road

Macon, Ga., 31061

(As of May, 2000)

 

Notes for GEORGE MORTON:

Carolyn Wylie and George Morton were divorced.

 

20. ii. FRED EVERETT WYLIE JR..

iii. MARY ANN WYLIE, m. JAMES BLOODWORTH.

 

Notes for MARY ANN WYLIE:

Mary Ann Wylie (Bloodworth)

5411 Houston Road Lot# 39

Macon, GA

(As of May, 2000)

 

iv. BOBBY WYLIE.

 

Notes for BOBBY WYLIE:

Bobby Wylie was killed by the police in Macon, Georgia as a teenager.

 

Children of FRED WYLIE and ADA SMITH are:

21. v. BETTY8 WYLIE, b. Sep 30, 1935, Benoit, Bolivar County, Mississippi.

vi. LONNIE WYLIE, b. Oct 02, 1939; m. (1) DAISY RAGLAND; m. (2) MARY CONOWAY.

vii. RONNIE WYLIE, b. Oct 02, 1939; m. BEULAH MCCLENDON; d. Jan 03, 2001.

 

More About BEULAH MCCLENDON:

Burial: Jan 05, 2001

 

22. viii. SHIRLEY WYLIE, b. Feb 07, 1941, Kilbourne, Louisiana.

ix. ADA LOUISE WYLIE, b. Aug 27, 1937; d. Jan 24, 1990.

 

 

14. GRADY ELTON7 WYLIE (LANTY HILL WYLIE6 SR, ANDREW THOMAS5 WILEY, ANDREW H.4, ROBERT S.3, ROBERT WILEY2 SR., WILLIAM1 WILEY) was born Mar 31, 1916, and died Jul 16, 1977 in Monroe, Louisiana. He married (1) PAULINE (POLLY) SMITH. He married (2) RUTH SMITH Jul 26, 1938, daughter of DUNCAN JR. and CATHERINE BUCKNER. She was born Jan 24, 1916 in Pelahatchie,Mississippi.

 

Notes for GRADY ELTON WYLIE:

Grady E. Wylie and Ruth Smith were divorced in 1967.

 

Social Security Number 428-14-0295

 

More About GRADY ELTON WYLIE:

Burial: Lobville, Tennessee at Leeper Cemetery

Children of GRADY WYLIE and RUTH SMITH are:

23. i. THOMAS EARL8 WYLIE, b. Oct 09, 1940.

24. ii. ELIZABETH IRENE WYLIE, b. May 29, 1942, Kilbourne, Louisiana.

25. iii. BARBARA JEAN WYLIE, b. Oct 14, 1944, Mississippi.

26. iv. WINNIE RUTH WYLIE, b. May 31, 1949, Kilbourne, Louisiana; d. Jul 16, 1997, Bastrop, Louisiana.

27. v. JOHNNY LEE WYLIE, b. Oct 30, 1950, Kilbourne, Louisiana.

28. vi. JO ANN WYLIE, b. May 10, 1952, Kilbourne, Louisiana.

 

 

15. CLYDE H7 WYLIE (LANTY HILL WYLIE6 SR, ANDREW THOMAS5 WILEY, ANDREW H.4, ROBERT S.3, ROBERT WILEY2 SR., WILLIAM1 WILEY) was born Dec 16, 1918, and died Aug 25, 1997 in Alexandria, Louisiana. He married (1) FRANCES GUNN, daughter of M.C. SR. and IRENE JOHNSON. She was born Dec 22, 1930 in Columbia, Louisiana. He married (2) RUBY EVELYN KENNEY, daughter of JOSEPH KENNEY and HATTIE AUSTIN. She was born Apr 23, 1923, and died Apr 28, 1978.

 

Notes for CLYDE H WYLIE:

 

From the early history of Perry County Tennessee.

Clyde Huffstedler Wylie's middle name came from Dr. Huffstedler. This is the beginning of the Huffstedler line

in Perry County.

 

Grandfather, Jacob (or Johann Jacob) HOCHSTATTLER was born 1701 in Germany.

In 1736 Jacob b.1701, his wife & 3 children boarded the Ship HARLE enroute to

America. His wife gave birth to a son aboard the ship in 1736, and the son

was named Michael.

Jacob b.1785 is the nephew of Michael HOCHSTATTLER, born 1736 aboard the

Ship HARLE enroute to the new world.

Father - Jacob HOCHSTATLER was born 1746 in either NC or SC.

Son - Jacob HUFSTEDLER, was born 1785 in York Co SC., settled on Cane Creek with his family in 1821.

 

More About CLYDE H WYLIE:

Burial: Kilbourne, West Carroll Parish, Louisiana

 

More About RUBY EVELYN KENNEY:

Burial: Lakeland, Floridia

Children of CLYDE WYLIE and FRANCES GUNN are:

29. i. CLYDETTE8 WYLIE, b. Sep 01, 1956, Lake Village, Arkansas.

30. ii. DEBBIE WYLIE, b. Jul 26, 1957, Lake Village, Arkansas.

31. iii. CONNIE WYLIE, b. Nov 15, 1959.

32. iv. PATRICIA DIANE WYLIE, b. Oct 25, 1963, Lake Village, Arkansas.

33. v. CLYDE H WYLIE JR., b. Sep 18, 1962.

 

Children of CLYDE WYLIE and RUBY KENNEY are:

vi. RUBY JEAN8 WYLIE, b. Dec 17, 1941; m. RICHARD SAMUEL HARDING JR., Sep 11, 1961, Iowa Park, Texas.

vii. C H WYLIE, b. Mar 03, 1944.

34. viii. ROBERT EARL WYLIE, b. Mar 26, 1946, Kilbourne, West Carroll Parish, Louisiana.

 

 

16. C PAUL7 WYLIE (LANTY HILL WYLIE6 SR, ANDREW THOMAS5 WILEY, ANDREW H.4, ROBERT S.3, ROBERT WILEY2 SR., WILLIAM1 WILEY) was born Jul 24, 1922 in Parson, Decatur County, Tennessee. He married (1) VERNA MAE FRITH Mar 1940, daughter of JAMES FRITH and ZONA SULLIVAN. She was born Apr 28, 1923 in Raliegh, Louisiana, and died Jun 07, 1997 in Banning, California. He married (2) AMBER LOUISE BURNEY May 26, 1951 in Eudora, Arkansas, daughter of Z. SR. and ZELMA COFFEE. She was born Jan 10, 1929 in Whiteville, North Carolina.

Children of C WYLIE and VERNA FRITH are:

35. i. C. PAUL WYLIE8 JR., b. Mar 25, 1940, Kilbourne, Louisiana.

ii. FANNIE LOU WYLIE, b. Sep 28, 1941, Kilbourne, Louisiana.

iii. ALICE FAYE WYLIE, b. Oct 27, 1943; d. Dec 05, 1995, Banning, California.

 

Children of C WYLIE and AMBER BURNEY are:

36. iv. BONNIE LOUISE8 WYLIE, b. Jun 24, 1952, Franklin, Louisiana.

37. v. CYNTHIA PAULETTE WYLIE, b. Oct 07, 1955, Koseiusko, Mississippi.

 

 

17. FANNIE MAE7 WYLIE (LANTY HILL WYLIE6 SR, ANDREW THOMAS5 WILEY, ANDREW H.4, ROBERT S.3, ROBERT WILEY2 SR., WILLIAM1 WILEY) was born Nov 11, 1927 in Parsons, Decatur, Tennessee. She married (1) ODIE EDWARD MORTON Dec 15, 1945 in Corinth, Alcorn, Mississippi. He was born Jan 18, 1923 in Murray, Calloway, Kentucky, and died Oct 08, 1947 in Camden, Benton, Tennessee. She married (2) HORACE WILLARD UTLEY Oct 02, 1949 in Corenth, Alcorn, Mississippi. He was born Dec 15, 1919 in Camden, Benton, Tennessee.

 

Notes for ODIE EDWARD MORTON:

Odie Edward Morton was working at a saw mill, (Durdin's Saw Mill)

He was killed at the Mill on the morning of October 8, 1947.

No one knows if he reached to feel of the saw or slipped and fell into it.

 

More About ODIE EDWARD MORTON:

Burial: Oct 09, 1947, Morris Chapel Cemetary

Child of FANNIE WYLIE and ODIE MORTON is:

38. i. JIMMY RAY8 MORTON, b. Oct 09, 1946, Camden, Benton, Tennessee.

 

Child of FANNIE WYLIE and HORACE UTLEY is:

39. ii. ANTHONY HORACE8 UTLEY, b. May 04, 1951, Camden, Benton, Tennessee.

 

 

18. LANTY H WYLIE7 JR (LANTY HILL WYLIE6 SR, ANDREW THOMAS5 WILEY, ANDREW H.4, ROBERT S.3, ROBERT WILEY2 SR., WILLIAM1 WILEY) was born Nov 06, 1932 in Benoit, Bolivar County, Mississippi. He married PATRICIA BARKER MCLEMORE Jun 09, 1956 in Fort Worth, Texas, daughter of JOHN MCLEMORE and MURIEL ERWIN. She was born Jul 02, 1938 in Ladonia, Fannin County, Texas.

 

Notes for LANTY H WYLIE JR:

 

 

I was born at 10:00 A.M., November 6, 1932, A Sunday morning.

Benoit, Bolivar, County, Mississippi, Bureau of Vital Statistics, Dist. No. 46, Reg. No. 8087, File#34604

I weighed eight pounds. My Dad wanted to name me Ralph, but my Mother prevailed and I was named

Lanty Hill Wylie Jr. The Cunningham family from Tennessee, Walter Cunningham, lived close by and

called my Dad "Uncle Lanty," so for the next seventeen years I was called "L.H.". We were living

on Sam Speaks Plantation in the Mississippi Delta, in Bolivar, County, in the poorest state in the

Union, in the middle of a great economic depression. My Dad was the plantation manager.

 

Mother was happy with my Dad throughout the marriage. She missed my Dad very much after his death.

My Dad was ten years older than my Mother. There were very few arguments and disagreements between

them. Even though my Mother didn't work in the cotton fields, there was plenty of work to be done

around the house with my Dad, his four sons, from a previous marriage and her daughter, Hazel,

from my Mother's marriage to Parker.

 

Dad told me he was named Lanty after Lanty Lancelot Johnston, a distant relative. Lanty Johnston

had three children before he was killed, in Tennessee, during the war between the states. My family,

on both sides, were from Tennessee and had deep feelings for the South.

 

 

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UNITED STATES AIR FORCE

 

Joined the U.S. Air Force Nov 27, 1951,

Honorable Discharge from active service Nov 26, 1955

Honorable Discharge from reserves Oct 31, 1959

Basic Training at Sheppard AFB, Texas

Radio School at Keesler AFB Mississippi

Kimpo AFB, Korea, AACS Squadron Op. Loc. 14 (This location was classified as a combat zone,

for good reason.)

Carswell AFB, Texas AACS

Eniwetok Island Pacific, Atomic Bomb Test Project Castle, AACS

Carswell AFB, Texas AACS, (Made Staff Sergeant)

Sheppard AFB, Texas School

Carswell AFB, Texas AACS

(Airways and Air Communications Service = AACS)

 

Korean Service Medal/with 3 battle stars

United Nations Service Medal

Republic of Korea Presidential Unit Citation

Good Conduct Medal

 

 

Over seas assignment totals 1 year 4 months and 25 days.

Speciality Number 29351B

 

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Atomic Devices Exploded on Project Castle

 

March 1, 1954 a 15 Megaton bomb, BRAVO, was shot near Bikini on a sandpit off Nam Island.

 

March 27, 1954 an 11 Megaton bomb, ROMEO, was shot near Bikini on a barge in BRAVO crater.

 

April 7, 1954 a 110 Kiloton bomb, KOON was shot near Bikini on the surface of Eneman Island.

 

April 26, 1954 a 6.9 Megaton bomb, UNION, was shot near Bikini on a barge in the lagoon off Iroij

Island.

 

May 5, 1954 a 13.5 Megaton bomb, YANKEE, was shot near Bikini UNION Crater.

 

May 14, 1954 a 1.6 Megaton bomb, NECTAR, was shot near Bikini on a barge in MIKE crater. (The

MIKE shot was on a previous test series and was the first Hydrogen bomb ever exploded.)

 

The Atomic bombs we dropped on Japan were fire crackers compared to these babies. To describe an

Atomic bomb test, some one said, " IT BLEACHED THE MORNING SKY ", I will add that it blew a hole

in the ocean floor several miles in diameter and each shot spread radiation by the prevailing winds

around the world.

 

The news papers were about a week old by the time I got to read them. There was always a lot of

information in them that we were not supposed to talk about, the weather, shot times, expected

bomb yield and things of that nature.

 

As usual, our AACS unit provided all Air Force Communications with the outside world. Our radio group provided all communications concerning aircraft. There were flight plans, operation normal or abnormal reports, arrival and departure information and information of that type. We received weather reports every hour or more if weather conditions changed. This information came from AACS units on different islands around the shot area. On shot days, most of our traffic was weather related. On these days, things would tense up quite a bit. If there was going to be a foul up, it was not going to come from the AACS unit. After the shot, all communications ceased. There is so much inoized radiation in the air, communications cannot get through. This communications block last about 30 minutes.

A deep sense of unit pride was in every one I was ever assigned with in AACS. Those that didn't share that sense of unit pride didn't last long in any sensitive job.

 

 

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Port Arthur College, Port Arthur, Texas (Passed and obtained Federal Communications Commission

First Class Radiotelephone,

Second Class Telegraph with Radar Endorsement,

Amateur Extra Class License)

 

Tarrant County Junior College (Completed Management Course, 4 years of night school)

 

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Worked at Knights Communications, Inc.

Air Signal International, Inc.

Page-A-Fone, Inc.

DFW Signal, Inc.

and a start-up Radio Paging Company I named AACS Communications, Inc.

Retired March 1, 1998

 

(Marriage and Children are included in another section of this Family Tree)

 

Lanty H. Wylie Jr.

 

 

Children of LANTY JR and PATRICIA MCLEMORE are:

i. LAURIE SUZANNE8 WYLIE, b. Apr 18, 1957, Fort Worth, Texas; m. JAMES HAROLD MCCOLLUM, Nov 10, 1979, Hurst, Tarrant County, Texas; b. Dec 07, 1947, Steele, Pemiscot County, Missouiri.

 

Notes for LAURIE SUZANNE WYLIE:

Laurie Suzanne Wylie was born at St. Joseph's Hospital

in Fort Worth, Texas.

 

40. ii. LANTY MARCUS WYLIE, b. Aug 28, 1959, Fort Worth, Tarrant, Texas.

 

 

19. MARY LEE7 WYLIE (LANTY HILL WYLIE6 SR, ANDREW THOMAS5 WILEY, ANDREW H.4, ROBERT S.3, ROBERT WILEY2 SR., WILLIAM1 WILEY) was born Feb 08, 1947 in Kilbourne, West Carroll Parish, Louisiana. She married (1) PAUL WAYNE DAVIS Jul 02, 1967 in Hurst, Tarrant County, Texas. He was born Jun 18, 1942 in Lawton, Oklahoma. She married (2) LAWRENCE OKEEFE Apr 29, 1991 in The Woodlands, Texas, son of LAWRENCE SR. and MARY MCCAFFERTY. He was born Jul 11, 1952 in St. Louis, Missouri.

Child of MARY WYLIE and PAUL DAVIS is:

41. i. JULIE ANNE8 DAVIS, b. Feb 14, 1968, Fort Worth, Texas.

 

 

Generation No. 8

 

20. FRED EVERETT WYLIE8 JR. (FRED E7 WYLIE, LANTY HILL WYLIE6 SR, ANDREW THOMAS5 WILEY, ANDREW H.4, ROBERT S.3, ROBERT WILEY2 SR., WILLIAM1 WILEY) He married DARLA.

 

Notes for FRED EVERETT WYLIE JR.:

Fred, Jr's current wife is Darla. She has a daughter named Misty Dawn.

Fred, Jr., has a daughter with Darla. Her name is April Sheree. she is 9 years old.

That would make her born in 1991. He also has a grandson named Josh.

There have been a couple of other wives and all together probably 6 or 7 children.

Children of FRED JR. and DARLA are:

i. MISTY9 DAWN.

ii. APRIL SHEREE WYLIE, b. 1991.

 

 

21. BETTY8 WYLIE (FRED E7, LANTY HILL WYLIE6 SR, ANDREW THOMAS5 WILEY, ANDREW H.4, ROBERT S.3, ROBERT WILEY2 SR., WILLIAM1 WILEY) was born Sep 30, 1935 in Benoit, Bolivar County, Mississippi. She married GROVER CLEVELAND WILLIAMS JR. Jan 10, 1949.

Children of BETTY WYLIE and GROVER JR. are:

42. i. JIMMY DOYLE9 WILLIAMS, b. Jun 08, 1950, Greenville, Mississippi.

43. ii. BOBBY GENE WILLIAMS, b. Nov 24, 1952, Greenville, Mississippi.

44. iii. JEANNIE LOUISE WILLIAMS, b. Jan 10, 1960, Greenville, Mississippi.

45. iv. DEBORAH KAY WILLIAMS, b. May 24, 1962, Greenville, Mississippi.

 

 

22. SHIRLEY8 WYLIE (FRED E7, LANTY HILL WYLIE6 SR, ANDREW THOMAS5 WILEY, ANDREW H.4, ROBERT S.3, ROBERT WILEY2 SR., WILLIAM1 WILEY) was born Feb 07, 1941 in Kilbourne, Louisiana. She married (1) JERRY WAYNE HAMM. She married (2) JOHN WEST. He died Dec 11, 1997.

 

Notes for SHIRLEY WYLIE:

Shirley's address is:

990 Ada Street

Greenville, Mississippi 38701

(As of May, 2000)

 

Notes for JERRY WAYNE HAMM:

Marriage between Shirley Wylie and Jerry Hamm was annulled.

Children of SHIRLEY WYLIE and JOHN WEST are:

i. SHIELA9 WYLIE.

46. ii. VICKIE WEST.

 

 

23. THOMAS EARL8 WYLIE (GRADY ELTON7, LANTY HILL WYLIE6 SR, ANDREW THOMAS5 WILEY, ANDREW H.4, ROBERT S.3, ROBERT WILEY2 SR., WILLIAM1 WILEY) was born Oct 09, 1940. He married (1) NANCY SUE SMITH. He married (2) BONNIE SUE HODGE Jul 29, 1960.

 

Notes for NANCY SUE SMITH:

Little is known about the marriage of Tommy Wylie and Nancy Smith.

Their son Luther was put up for adoption in the Alexandria, Louisiana area.

So, it is uncertain if Luther retains the Wylie name.

Child of THOMAS WYLIE and NANCY SMITH is:

i. LUTHER9 WYLIE, b. 1987.

 

Children of THOMAS WYLIE and BONNIE HODGE are:

ii. BONNIE RUTH9 WYLIE, b. Sep 21, 1961; m. MIKE NEWSOM, West Monroe, Louisiana.

47. iii. TOMMY LEE WYLIE, b. Aug 17, 1963.

48. iv. JAMES EARL WYLIE, b. Dec 09, 1964.

49. v. DUNCAN ROY WYLIE, b. Jul 26, 1968.

 

 

24. ELIZABETH IRENE8 WYLIE (GRADY ELTON7, LANTY HILL WYLIE6 SR, ANDREW THOMAS5 WILEY, ANDREW H.4, ROBERT S.3, ROBERT WILEY2 SR., WILLIAM1 WILEY) was born May 29, 1942 in Kilbourne, Louisiana. She married JAMES ROY FULLER JR. Jun 02, 1965 in Texas.

Children of ELIZABETH WYLIE and JAMES JR. are:

i. REBECCA ELIZABETH9 FULLER, b. May 29, 1969, Monroe, Louisiana.

50. ii. JAMES ROY FULLER III, b. Apr 06, 1966.

 

 

25. BARBARA JEAN8 WYLIE (GRADY ELTON7, LANTY HILL WYLIE6 SR, ANDREW THOMAS5 WILEY, ANDREW H.4, ROBERT S.3, ROBERT WILEY2 SR., WILLIAM1 WILEY) was born Oct 14, 1944 in Mississippi. She married TOMMY MARILAND FARRIS May 20, 1965 in Greenville, Mississippi.

Children of BARBARA WYLIE and TOMMY FARRIS are:

51. i. DONNA JEAN9 FARRIS, b. May 22, 1966.

ii. WAYNE FARRIS, b. Feb 02, 1969.

iii. ANGELICA IRENE FARRIS, b. Oct 16, 1970.

iv. LANIE RUTH FARRIS, b. Sep 08, 1971.

v. DAVID FARRIS, b. Jun 17, 1977.

 

 

26. WINNIE RUTH8 WYLIE (GRADY ELTON7, LANTY HILL WYLIE6 SR, ANDREW THOMAS5 WILEY, ANDREW H.4, ROBERT S.3, ROBERT WILEY2 SR., WILLIAM1 WILEY) was born May 31, 1949 in Kilbourne, Louisiana, and died Jul 16, 1997 in Bastrop, Louisiana. She married CLIFFORD RAYMOND MILLER.

 

More About WINNIE RUTH WYLIE:

Burial: Kilbourne, Cemetery, Louisiana

Children of WINNIE WYLIE and CLIFFORD MILLER are:

i. CLIFFORD RAYMONE9 MILLER II, b. Jan 15, 1974; m. PAMELA ANTLEY, Jun 17, 2000.

ii. DELFINA DANIELLE MILLER, b. Jan 13, 1975; m. PRESTON BRYAN, Apr 09, 2000, West Monroe, Louisiana.

 

 

27. JOHNNY LEE8 WYLIE (GRADY ELTON7, LANTY HILL WYLIE6 SR, ANDREW THOMAS5 WILEY, ANDREW H.4, ROBERT S.3, ROBERT WILEY2 SR., WILLIAM1 WILEY) was born Oct 30, 1950 in Kilbourne, Louisiana. He married SHARON ELIZABETH MAXWELL Sep 08, 1972 in Monroe, Louisiana.

Children of JOHNNY WYLIE and SHARON MAXWELL are:

i. JAMES LEE9 WYLIE, b. Jul 05, 1970.

 

Notes for JAMES LEE WYLIE:

James Lee Wylie is Sharon's son by a previous marriage and adopted by Johnny.

 

52. ii. JOHN ANDREW WYLIE, b. Feb 19, 1977.

iii. COURTNEY ELIZABETH WYLIE, b. Sep 04, 1979, Baytown, Texas; m. WALTER STIEFER; b. Jan 17, 1978.

iv. SETH EDWARD WYLIE, b. Sep 01, 1987, Baytown, Texas.

 

 

28. JO ANN8 WYLIE (GRADY ELTON7, LANTY HILL WYLIE6 SR, ANDREW THOMAS5 WILEY, ANDREW H.4, ROBERT S.3, ROBERT WILEY2 SR., WILLIAM1 WILEY) was born May 10, 1952 in Kilbourne, Louisiana. She married ROBERT WILLIAM MCGEE Jul 07, 1969. He was born Dec 02, 1942.

Children of JO WYLIE and ROBERT MCGEE are:

i. BRADLEY WILLIAM9 MCGEE, b. Jan 10, 1975, Bastrop, Louisiana.

ii. TRACY ANN MCGEE, b. Jun 15, 1978, Bastrop, Louisiana.

 

 

29. CLYDETTE8 WYLIE (CLYDE H7, LANTY HILL WYLIE6 SR, ANDREW THOMAS5 WILEY, ANDREW H.4, ROBERT S.3, ROBERT WILEY2 SR., WILLIAM1 WILEY) was born Sep 01, 1956 in Lake Village, Arkansas. She married DENNIS SEAMANS Nov 05, 1976 in Marshall, Texas. He was born Aug 11, 1959 in Delhi, Richland Parrish, Louisiana.

Children of CLYDETTE WYLIE and DENNIS SEAMANS are:

i. JARRED PAUL9 SEAMANS, b. Apr 25, 1977.

ii. LEAH ELIZABETH SEAMANS, b. Sep 15, 1983.

 

 

30. DEBBIE8 WYLIE (CLYDE H7, LANTY HILL WYLIE6 SR, ANDREW THOMAS5 WILEY, ANDREW H.4, ROBERT S.3, ROBERT WILEY2 SR., WILLIAM1 WILEY) was born Jul 26, 1957 in Lake Village, Arkansas. She married EDDIE ALLEN Apr 07, 1979. He was born May 31, 1948.

Children of DEBBIE WYLIE and EDDIE ALLEN are:

i. JEREMY HEATH9 ALLEN, b. Mar 18, 1983.

ii. HOLLY BLYTHE ALLEN, b. Jul 07, 1988.

 

 

31. CONNIE8 WYLIE (CLYDE H7, LANTY HILL WYLIE6 SR, ANDREW THOMAS5 WILEY, ANDREW H.4, ROBERT S.3, ROBERT WILEY2 SR., WILLIAM1 WILEY) was born Nov 15, 1959. She married RONNALD COLLINS HUBBARD Jan 15, 1985 in Marshall, Texas. He was born Mar 12, 1958.

Children of CONNIE WYLIE and RONNALD HUBBARD are:

i. RONALD COLLINS HUBBARD9 JR., b. Dec 09, 1987.

ii. JENNIFER LEANNE., b. May 23, 1990.

 

 

32. PATRICIA DIANE8 WYLIE (CLYDE H7, LANTY HILL WYLIE6 SR, ANDREW THOMAS5 WILEY, ANDREW H.4, ROBERT S.3, ROBERT WILEY2 SR., WILLIAM1 WILEY) was born Oct 25, 1963 in Lake Village, Arkansas. She married (1) DAVIS STEPHENS. He was born Jan 11, 1957. She married (2) GREG ZIPP Aug 03, 1995 in Mandeville, Louisiana. He was born Jan 27, 1959.

Child of PATRICIA WYLIE and DAVIS STEPHENS is:

i. CAMERON9 STEPHENS, b. Sep 23, 1987.

 

 

33. CLYDE H WYLIE8 JR. (CLYDE H7 WYLIE, LANTY HILL WYLIE6 SR, ANDREW THOMAS5 WILEY, ANDREW H.4, ROBERT S.3, ROBERT WILEY2 SR., WILLIAM1 WILEY) was born Sep 18, 1962. He married CELITA MANSFIELD Aug 05, 1989 in Duluth, Georgia.

Children of CLYDE JR. and CELITA MANSFIELD are:

i. EMILY REBECCA9 ., b. Nov 15, 1995.

ii. ANNA GRACE WYLIE, b. Jan 03, 2001.

 

 

34. ROBERT EARL8 WYLIE (CLYDE H7, LANTY HILL WYLIE6 SR, ANDREW THOMAS5 WILEY, ANDREW H.4, ROBERT S.3, ROBERT WILEY2 SR., WILLIAM1 WILEY) was born Mar 26, 1946 in Kilbourne, West Carroll Parish, Louisiana. He married (1) DOROTHY HERRING. She was born May 10, 1949. He married (2) LINDA JONSON.

Child of ROBERT WYLIE and LINDA JONSON is:

53. i. JACQUELINE MICHELLE9 WYLIE.

 

 

35. C. PAUL WYLIE8 JR. (C PAUL7 WYLIE, LANTY HILL WYLIE6 SR, ANDREW THOMAS5 WILEY, ANDREW H.4, ROBERT S.3, ROBERT WILEY2 SR., WILLIAM1 WILEY) was born Mar 25, 1940 in Kilbourne, Louisiana. He married (1) LOU JOYCE WELCH. He married (2) VERGIE JANE LEBOUEF.

Children of C. JR. and LOU WELCH are:

i. SCOTT ALLEN9 WYLIE, b. Jan 12, 1971.

ii. LANTY JOSEPH WYLIE, b. Sep 19, 1977.

 

Children of C. JR. and VERGIE LEBOUEF are:

iii. JULIANN CHRISTYN9 WYLIE, b. Jul 15, 1984.

iv. CLOYS PAUL WYLIE III, b. Feb 08, 1989.

 

 

36. BONNIE LOUISE8 WYLIE (C PAUL7, LANTY HILL WYLIE6 SR, ANDREW THOMAS5 WILEY, ANDREW H.4, ROBERT S.3, ROBERT WILEY2 SR., WILLIAM1 WILEY) was born Jun 24, 1952 in Franklin, Louisiana. She married CHARLES G. BURGE Jun 20, 1973 in Newton, Texas.

Children of BONNIE WYLIE and CHARLES BURGE are:

i. AMBERLY MARIE9 BURGE, b. Jul 12, 1974.

ii. CHARLES GORDON BURGE JR., b. May 29, 1979.

iii. PAUL DAVID BURGE, b. Nov 16, 1981.

 

 

37. CYNTHIA PAULETTE8 WYLIE (C PAUL7, LANTY HILL WYLIE6 SR, ANDREW THOMAS5 WILEY, ANDREW H.4, ROBERT S.3, ROBERT WILEY2 SR., WILLIAM1 WILEY) was born Oct 07, 1955 in Koseiusko, Mississippi. She married JESSE R. FRANKS Nov 03, 1973 in DeQuincy, Louisiana.

Children of CYNTHIA WYLIE and JESSE FRANKS are:

i. JARED HEATH9 FRANKS, b. May 29, 1978.

ii. JONATHON LUKE FRANKS, b. Jul 21, 1982.

 

 

38. JIMMY RAY8 MORTON (FANNIE MAE7 WYLIE, LANTY HILL WYLIE6 SR, ANDREW THOMAS5 WILEY, ANDREW H.4, ROBERT S.3, ROBERT WILEY2 SR., WILLIAM1 WILEY) was born Oct 09, 1946 in Camden, Benton, Tennessee. He married (1) JANET SMITH Jan 14, 1966 in Camden, Benton, Tennessee. She was born Apr 14, 1948 in Jackson, Madison, Tennessee. He married (2) SHARON MORRIS Nov 11, 1977 in Camden, Benton, Tennessee. She was born Aug 29, 1954 in Camden, Benton, Tennessee.

Children of JIMMY MORTON and JANET SMITH are:

54. i. YVETTE9 MORTON, b. Aug 02, 1969, Camden, Benton, Tennessee.

55. ii. HOPE MORTON, b. Mar 31, 1971, Camden, Benton, Tennessee.

 

 

39. ANTHONY HORACE8 UTLEY (FANNIE MAE7 WYLIE, LANTY HILL WYLIE6 SR, ANDREW THOMAS5 WILEY, ANDREW H.4, ROBERT S.3, ROBERT WILEY2 SR., WILLIAM1 WILEY) was born May 04, 1951 in Camden, Benton, Tennessee. He married MELINDA ALLEN Aug 21, 1969 in Camden, Benton, Tennessee. She was born Jan 29, 1953.

Children of ANTHONY UTLEY and MELINDA ALLEN are:

56. i. JASON PATRICK9 UTLEY, b. Feb 05, 1971, Camden, Benton, Tennessee.

ii. JULIE YVONNE UTLEY, b. Mar 20, 1975, Camden, Benton, Tennessee.

iii. JENNY LYNN UTLEY.

 

Notes for JENNY LYNN UTLEY:

Jenny Lynn Utley died within 6 mo. of birth.

 

 

40. LANTY MARCUS8 WYLIE (LANTY H WYLIE7 JR, LANTY HILL WYLIE6 SR, ANDREW THOMAS5 WILEY, ANDREW H.4, ROBERT S.3, ROBERT WILEY2 SR., WILLIAM1 WILEY) was born Aug 28, 1959 in Fort Worth, Tarrant, Texas. He married SUZANNE ETHEL TORNETTA Aug 09, 1997 in Norristown, Montogomery, Pennsylvania, daughter of ANTHONY TORNETTA and DORTHY MORGAN. She was born Dec 28, 1963 in Norristown, Montgomery, Pennsylvania.

 

Notes for LANTY MARCUS WYLIE:

Lanty Marcus Wylie was born at St. Joseph's Hospital

in Fort Worth, Texas.

Children of LANTY WYLIE and SUZANNE TORNETTA are:

i. PAMELA ROSE9 WYLIE, b. Apr 12, 1999, Dallas, Dallas, Texas.

 

Notes for PAMELA ROSE WYLIE:

Patricia B. Wylie and I, Lanty H. Wylie Jr., left our home in

Lindale, Texas and went directly to Medical City Dallas, Texas

on Monday, April 12, 1999. Suzanne Wylie was already in labor. She

was in labor for about 12 hours when the baby was taken by

Caesarian Section at 10:15 PM. Pamela weighed 7 pounds

14 ounces. She was 22.25 inches long.

No complications, she was a normal healthy child very calm and

alert.

 

ii. NICHOLAS MORGAN WYLIE, b. Jun 28, 2001, Dallas, Texas.

 

Notes for NICHOLAS MORGAN WYLIE:

On June 27, 2001 Patricia B. Wylie and I, Lanty H. Wylie Jr.,

went to Dallas and stayed with Pamela Rose Wylie at her

home while Lanty Marcus Wylie and Suzanne Wylie went

to the hospital (6/28/01) to await Nicholas's birth. About 1 PM the

three of us went to the hospital and saw Nicholas for the

first time. He was born at 7:50 AM, Thursday, June 28, 2001 via Cesarian

Section. He weighed 7 pounds 12 ounces. He was 20.75 inches long.

He is a normal healthy child, very robust when he is wet or

unhappy.

 

 

41. JULIE ANNE8 DAVIS (MARY LEE7 WYLIE, LANTY HILL WYLIE6 SR, ANDREW THOMAS5 WILEY, ANDREW H.4, ROBERT S.3, ROBERT WILEY2 SR., WILLIAM1 WILEY) was born Feb 14, 1968 in Fort Worth, Texas. She married DOUGLAS WILLIAMS Feb 28, 1986 in Flour Mound, Texas.

Child of JULIE DAVIS and DOUGLAS WILLIAMS is:

i. COURTNEY PAIGE9 WILLIAMS, b. Jul 25, 1988.

 

 

Generation No. 9

 

42. JIMMY DOYLE9 WILLIAMS (BETTY8 WYLIE, FRED E7, LANTY HILL WYLIE6 SR, ANDREW THOMAS5 WILEY, ANDREW H.4, ROBERT S.3, ROBERT WILEY2 SR., WILLIAM1 WILEY) was born Jun 08, 1950 in Greenville, Mississippi. He married ALMA JEAN HENDERSON.

Children of JIMMY WILLIAMS and ALMA HENDERSON are:

i. JAMES CLEVELAND10 WILLIAMS.

57. ii. DOYLE O'BRIAN WILLIAMS.

 

 

43. BOBBY GENE9 WILLIAMS (BETTY8 WYLIE, FRED E7, LANTY HILL WYLIE6 SR, ANDREW THOMAS5 WILEY, ANDREW H.4, ROBERT S.3, ROBERT WILEY2 SR., WILLIAM1 WILEY) was born Nov 24, 1952 in Greenville, Mississippi. He married WANDA BROOK WILKERSON.

Child of BOBBY WILLIAMS and WANDA WILKERSON is:

i. EMILY BROOK10 WILLIAMS.

 

 

44. JEANNIE LOUISE9 WILLIAMS (BETTY8 WYLIE, FRED E7, LANTY HILL WYLIE6 SR, ANDREW THOMAS5 WILEY, ANDREW H.4, ROBERT S.3, ROBERT WILEY2 SR., WILLIAM1 WILEY) was born Jan 10, 1960 in Greenville, Mississippi. She married THOMAS LEE BANCROFT.

Children of JEANNIE WILLIAMS and THOMAS BANCROFT are:

i. CANDICE LEIGH10 BANCROFT.

ii. KATIE BETH BANCROFT BANCROFT.

 

 

45. DEBORAH KAY9 WILLIAMS (BETTY8 WYLIE, FRED E7, LANTY HILL WYLIE6 SR, ANDREW THOMAS5 WILEY, ANDREW H.4, ROBERT S.3, ROBERT WILEY2 SR., WILLIAM1 WILEY) was born May 24, 1962 in Greenville, Mississippi. She married RONNIE CARROLL PRICE.

Children of DEBORAH WILLIAMS and RONNIE PRICE are:

i. JOSHUA BRENT10 PRICE.

ii. LYDIA NICOLE PRICE.

 

 

46. VICKIE9 WEST (SHIRLEY8 WYLIE, FRED E7, LANTY HILL WYLIE6 SR, ANDREW THOMAS5 WILEY, ANDREW H.4, ROBERT S.3, ROBERT WILEY2 SR., WILLIAM1 WILEY)

Child of VICKIE WEST is:

i. JOHN SCOTT10 WEST, b. Nov 21, 1979.

 

 

47. TOMMY LEE9 WYLIE (THOMAS EARL8, GRADY ELTON7, LANTY HILL WYLIE6 SR, ANDREW THOMAS5 WILEY, ANDREW H.4, ROBERT S.3, ROBERT WILEY2 SR., WILLIAM1 WILEY) was born Aug 17, 1963. He married (1) JAMI. He married (2) CINDY. He married (3) TINA.

Child of TOMMY WYLIE and JAMI is:

i. TIFFANY MARIE WYLIE10 WYLIE, b. Apr 01, 1982.

 

Child of TOMMY WYLIE and CINDY is:

ii. CLARA JADE10 WYLIE, b. Aug 18, 1991.

 

 

48. JAMES EARL9 WYLIE (THOMAS EARL8, GRADY ELTON7, LANTY HILL WYLIE6 SR, ANDREW THOMAS5 WILEY, ANDREW H.4, ROBERT S.3, ROBERT WILEY2 SR., WILLIAM1 WILEY) was born Dec 09, 1964. He married MELINDA.

Children of JAMES WYLIE and MELINDA are:

i. KEVIN EARL10 WYLIE.

ii. CASEY NICOLE WYLIE.

 

 

49. DUNCAN ROY9 WYLIE (THOMAS EARL8, GRADY ELTON7, LANTY HILL WYLIE6 SR, ANDREW THOMAS5 WILEY, ANDREW H.4, ROBERT S.3, ROBERT WILEY2 SR., WILLIAM1 WILEY) was born Jul 26, 1968. He married GINA.

 

Notes for DUNCAN ROY WYLIE:

Duncan Roy Wylie and Gina are Divorced.

Children of DUNCAN WYLIE and GINA are:

i. BRADLEY ROY10 WYLIE, b. Jun 30, 1990.

ii. BRYAN CHRISTOPHER WYLIE, b. Jun 22, 1992.

 

 

50. JAMES ROY9 FULLER III (ELIZABETH IRENE8 WYLIE, GRADY ELTON7, LANTY HILL WYLIE6 SR, ANDREW THOMAS5 WILEY, ANDREW H.4, ROBERT S.3, ROBERT WILEY2 SR., WILLIAM1 WILEY) was born Apr 06, 1966. He married SHARON DORINDA JORDAN Jul 21, 1990 in Monroe, Louisiana.

Child of JAMES FULLER and SHARON JORDAN is:

i. REBEKAH JORDAN10 FULLER, b. Nov 20, 1997.

 

 

51. DONNA JEAN9 FARRIS (BARBARA JEAN8 WYLIE, GRADY ELTON7, LANTY HILL WYLIE6 SR, ANDREW THOMAS5 WILEY, ANDREW H.4, ROBERT S.3, ROBERT WILEY2 SR., WILLIAM1 WILEY) was born May 22, 1966. She married PAUL CLAMPIT.

Children of DONNA FARRIS and PAUL CLAMPIT are:

i. DANIEL10 CLAMPIT.

ii. BENJAMIN CLAMPIT.

 

 

52. JOHN ANDREW9 WYLIE (JOHNNY LEE8, GRADY ELTON7, LANTY HILL WYLIE6 SR, ANDREW THOMAS5 WILEY, ANDREW H.4, ROBERT S.3, ROBERT WILEY2 SR., WILLIAM1 WILEY) was born Feb 19, 1977. He married DIVORCED (UNKNOWN).

Child of JOHN WYLIE and DIVORCED (UNKNOWN) is:

i. HUNTER10 WYLIE.

 

 

53. JACQUELINE MICHELLE9 WYLIE (ROBERT EARL8, CLYDE H7, LANTY HILL WYLIE6 SR, ANDREW THOMAS5 WILEY, ANDREW H.4, ROBERT S.3, ROBERT WILEY2 SR., WILLIAM1 WILEY) She married MITCHELL ARCHER.

Children of JACQUELINE WYLIE and MITCHELL ARCHER are:

i. ABBIE10 ARCHER.

ii. ALEX ARCHER.

 

 

54. YVETTE9 MORTON (JIMMY RAY8, FANNIE MAE7 WYLIE, LANTY HILL WYLIE6 SR, ANDREW THOMAS5 WILEY, ANDREW H.4, ROBERT S.3, ROBERT WILEY2 SR., WILLIAM1 WILEY) was born Aug 02, 1969 in Camden, Benton, Tennessee. She married JASON CVIKICH Jun 24, 1989 in Waverly, Humpherys, Tennessee. He was born Oct 10, 1969 in Dearborn, Michigan.

Child of YVETTE MORTON and JASON CVIKICH is:

i. KELSEY10 CVIKICH, b. Jul 21, 1992.

 

 

55. HOPE9 MORTON (JIMMY RAY8, FANNIE MAE7 WYLIE, LANTY HILL WYLIE6 SR, ANDREW THOMAS5 WILEY, ANDREW H.4, ROBERT S.3, ROBERT WILEY2 SR., WILLIAM1 WILEY) was born Mar 31, 1971 in Camden, Benton, Tennessee. She married RICHARD WHITLEY Dec 10, 1994 in Columbia, Maury, Tennessee. He was born Dec 16, 1965 in Columbia, Maury, Tennessee.

Children of HOPE MORTON and RICHARD WHITLEY are:

i. ZACHARY10 WHITLEY, b. Oct 29, 1996.

ii. ADAM WHITLEY, b. Jul 15, 1999.

 

 

56. JASON PATRICK9 UTLEY (ANTHONY HORACE8, FANNIE MAE7 WYLIE, LANTY HILL WYLIE6 SR, ANDREW THOMAS5 WILEY, ANDREW H.4, ROBERT S.3, ROBERT WILEY2 SR., WILLIAM1 WILEY) was born Feb 05, 1971 in Camden, Benton, Tennessee. He married APRIL CARY Nov 21, 1996 in Camden, Benton, Tennessee. She was born Apr 12, 1976 in Camden, Benton, Tennessee.

Child of JASON UTLEY and APRIL CARY is:

i. OWEN PATRICK10 UTLEY, b. Feb 16, 1999, Paris, Henry, Tennessee.

 

 

Generation No. 10

 

57. DOYLE O'BRIAN10 WILLIAMS (JIMMY DOYLE9, BETTY8 WYLIE, FRED E7, LANTY HILL WYLIE6 SR, ANDREW THOMAS5 WILEY, ANDREW H.4, ROBERT S.3, ROBERT WILEY2 SR., WILLIAM1 WILEY) He married NANCY GALE WEST.

Child of DOYLE WILLIAMS and NANCY WEST is:

i. AMANDA BETH11 WILLIAMS.

 

--------------------------------------------------------------------------

History of the Wylies

 

 

I am indebted primarily to Mrs. Mable Wylie Curry for the information I shall attempt to set down here. She celebrated here 93rd birthday on April 23, 1974 and died the following year. Her memory spans the best part of a century. A number of years ago she visited Chester County, SC to trace the origin of the family.

 

Halbert's claims that the names WYLIE, WILEY, WILLEY, WILL, WILLS and WILIE denoted a "descendant of WILEY (Tricky River)." an English name. Whether that has anything to do with the WYELYE River in Wiltshire is not indicated. The name is not uncommon in Scotland. The only source apparent in the Oxford Dictionary is the Middle English "WILY" for "crafty" and I suppose the WYLIES had to be that to have survived.

 

The WYLIES went to Ireland in the "Plantation of Scots and English" by James I, in 1607, according to Mable Wylie Curry, hereinafter referred to as MWC. According to Hugh Shearman in Ulster (all of Northern Ireland), plans for the Plantation were announced in 1609 and completed in 1610, but the Irish Earls, having been defeated after years of bitter fighting, fled in 1607 and the WYLIES may have immigrated before the Plantation became an official policy. Whether they were "undertakers" who were in charge of taking over Ulster Estates or tenants, we do not know.

 

 The Plantation covered Armagh, Tyrone, Fermanagh, Donegal, Cavean and Londonderry Counties. Since Londonderry was colonized by London companies, it is presumed that our people settled on one of the five other counties, all in the Western part of Ulster. Earlier, influential Scots had secured grants of land in Antrim and Down. For that matter, Scots had been invading Ireland for a long time, notably Robert and Edward Bruce, the latter brother having been crowned King of Ireland in 1316. Quaker chronicles show the names WILEY, WYLY and WILLY in West Meath, Coleraine and Antrim in the 17th and 18th centuries. But, as far as I know, there is no tradition of Quakers in the family.

 

Most of the Scots in the Plantation were lowlanders and they must found Ulster a wild and forbidding place. Through years of bloody fighting the Irish had practiced a scorched earth policy and the English were brutally destructive. The Irish were semi-nomadic, counting their wealth in cattle, which they could drive in search of pasture and to escape the invaders. There were some peaceful years and presumably the immigrants built up their farmsteads. Ulster became a stronghold of Scottish Presbyterianism. But intermittently for more than a century, there were wars, massacres, invasions, raids, looting, induced in part by troubles in England and Europe but nearly always involving the bitterness of Irish Catholics.

 

In the early part of the 18th century, the Ulster Presbyterians came to have cause to be bitter too, through political discrimination against them in England and by Episcopalian landlords who raised rents and often evicted them, leasing land to Irish Catholics willing to live in poverty. The Scots weren't much better off than the Irish and many began leaving for America. By 1729, some 5,000 emigrants a year left Ulster, and some 50 years later the annual immigration to America was 30,000.

 

 

 

Catherine Wylie Austin 2004

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Coming to America

 

 

 

Apparently the Wylies came to America in 1767. That was the year in which George Townshend became Viceroy of Ireland, he was the brother of Charles Townshend, Chancellor of the Exchequer, who was responsible for the tax on tea imported by Americans, and other odious taxes. One would like to know the circumstances under which the Wylie's made their fateful decision in 1767.


According to Martha Curry (MWC), Adam was the first Wylie to go from Scotland to Ireland, and Adam Wylie II was the one who came to America. She also tells the legend of the four Wylie brothers who sailed in a ship that was broken in two off the coast of America. Two of the brothers on one half were rescued and wound up in Pennsylvania. The two on the other half were rescued and wound up in South Carolina, having been rescued by fishermen from there. Not knowing their brothers survived, they settled in South Carolina.


MWC offers more convincing evidence from the passenger list of the ship "Earle of Donegal," Duncan Ferguson, Master, which arrived at Charleston, SC on December 22, 1767. On board were two families of Wylies. Those families are shown on one of the charts which follows.

 

According to Louis B. Wright in South Carolina, the Provincial government set aside three townships in the western part of the colony for new settlers, and beginning in 1761, offered passage money for "respectable poor protestants," 2 pounds for children 2 to 12, and 4 pounds for older people, plus bounties for the purchase of tools. It was said that the treatment of passengers in those days was often as bad or worse than that suffered by Africans in slave ships.

 

The South Carolinians were not just being hospitable. They were in terror of the Blacks and the Indians. In 1760, there were 57,253 slaves in the colony and not more than 6,000 male Whites over the age of 16. Slave traders and planters pushed the trade so hard that the colony put a duty on importation of slaves, with the proceed going to pay the bounties for settlers. The slaves at that time were used mostly on rice and indigo plantations and various incidents of violence showed there was good reason to fear an uprising.

 

There was increasing trouble with the Indians in the middle of the 18th century, for all the usual reasons, chiefly the expansion of the Whites into their territory. Ulster Scots in the one settlement, perhaps 59 of them, were massacred by a band of 100 Cherokees. An army of 1,200, including many highlanders and royal Scots, marched on them, burned their villages and drove them into the mountains. The Cherokees were forced in 1761 to sign a treaty opening the Piedmont to settlers.

 

So it was into this area that the Wylies came six years later. According to MWC, our branch became known as the "Fishing Creek" Wylies because they settled on a creek by that name, in what is now Chester Co. between the Broad and Catawba Rivers, not far from the North Carolina border. There is a town named Wylie (pop. 1514), just outside of Chester, the County Seat.

 

MWC saw a plaque on a gate at Chester: "This section of land granted to Peter Wylie by King George of England." Assuming James was the younger brother of Peter, he must have shared in the formidable task of carving a homestead in the forests of that section. There must have been years of desperate effort just to subsist before the farmers could produce, grain, cured meat, furs, cheese and other products to transport over the rough backwoods roads and down the Wateree River to Charleston, to trade for staples and ammunition.

  
In 1768, an Anglican clergyman who traveled through this area trying to save some souls, complained that the government wasn't doing enough to promote the Church of England. He wrote: "Hence it is that about 30,000 pounds sterling have lately been expended to bring over 5,000 or 6,000 ignorant, mean, worthless, beggarly Irish Presbyterians, the scum of the earth and refuse of mankind, and this solely to balance the emigration of people from Virginia, who are all of the Established Church."
 
Writing of the Scots (the Highlanders, the Lowlanders and the Ulster Scots who were called "Irish"), Louis Wright says: "They made important contributions to the settlement of the back country, though they were often clannish, contentious and difficult to assimilate into other groups."


Although these settlers provided a buffer against the Indians and opened up new land, they indeed resisted assimilation into the culture of the rich planters on the shore. They resented paying taxes without adequate representation in the government. They had strong religious differences with the planters and one can imagine they felt they had been exploited in being shipped across the sea to live the backwoods. Their reaction would be to assert their independence fiercely to spite the exploiters.
 
When the Tidewater Patriots began to agitate for independence from England, the backwoods Scots, with a deep antagonism for the rich planters and tradesmen, were not interested. Surely the people from Ulster had no reason to be loyal to English kings, but perhaps they were conservative and loyal by nature. In any event, most of them were Tories and while the Revolutionary was going on, a civil war of a sort was raging between the Tories and the Whigs, with guerilla fighting, plundering and burning of houses. Cherokees raided the northern settlements in 1776, scalping men, women and children, and the militia of South Carolina, North Carolina, Virginia and Georgia devastated their lands, forcing another treaty. According to General Edward McCrady in the history of South Carolina in the Revolution, there were 137 battles and minor engagements in South Carolina, more than in any of the 13 colonies, and most of these were guerilla encounters. At the Battle of Kings Mountain in 1780, some 40 miles north of Chester, the defeated British Commander, Major Patrick Ferguson, a Scot, had 1,100 men, and most were South Carolina Tories.

What part the Wylies played in all of this, we do not know. Wright says: "In April 1784, a dozen Tories came back to Fishing Creek in Chester County and tried to reclaim their homes. They were given 20 days to move away. At the expiration of this period of grace, eight were killed and the remaining four were sent as emissaries to warn other Tories that they too could expect to swing."  Since the Wylie's continued to live on Fishing Creek, presumably they were not conspicuously unpatriotic, but MWC says she thinks were are not eligible for the D.A.R. on the Wylie side.
 
MWC says the growth of slavery in South Carolina caused the Wylie's to migrate to the Indiana Territory. Eli Whitney's cotton gin, patented in 1794, had a good deal to do with this. The long-staple cotton (which had been grown in India for centuries) had seeds that were easy to remove, but the short-staple cotton, which could be grown in the uplands, had seeds that were difficult to pick out. Whitney's cotton gin solved the problem and cotton growing, and slaves, moved rapidly into the Piedmont. Low county planters bought large tracts in the up country. Congress passed an Act forbidding importation of slaves after 1808, but South Carolina relaxed its restrictions and the end of 1803 and in the next four years brought in 39,075 Blacks. South Carolina became foremost in defending the slave system.
 
The prospect of new lands in Indiana, which was to become a state in 1816, must have seemed very inviting. Controversy over whether the new state was to have slavery had been going on for several years, and even after the constitution was adopted, with provisions forbidding slavery, the issue was fought through the courts.

 

 

 

Catherine Wylie Austin 2004

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The Civil War Years

 

Fishing Creek, South Fork

 

The Women of the American Revolution, Vol 3, Pages 296, 297.

 

On the day of the action at Blackstock's, William White drove a wagon to bring flour, for which Col. Taylor had been sent with a detachment of fifty men to a mill in the vicinity. The understanding was that Sumter would remain where he was until Taylor's return; but shortly after his departure information came that Tarleton was advancing to the attack, and the general in consequence moved off to secure a more advantageous position.

 

Taylor knew nothing of Tarleton's approach, and when he returned with the flour and did not find Sumter, he was not a little displeased. His men were very hungry, and he allowed two or three hogs to be cleaned and cooked, and some of the flour to be made into bread. White was engaged in breaking the bread, in the fashion of johnny cake, on a piece of pine bark, at the moment when Sergeant Ben Rowan and Major Hannah, who had been sent out by Sumter to reconnoitre, dashed up in a fiery haste to bring the news that Tarleton was just at hand.

 

The hogs and the dough were thrown into the wagon uncooked, and Rowan used to say that William drove the wagon into camp at a full gallop. White said as he turned the corner of a little stable the firing commenced, and a ball passed through the sleeve of his hunting- shirt. He saw "Irish" Johnny Walker, and asked where two individuals were, whom he called by name. He replied that he did not know, but had last seen them running over the hill. "What shall we do?" then inquired White, and Walker answered - "Stand to them: we'll beat them any how."

 

White put three balls into his mouth to have them ready, and went into the fight. While this was going on, James Wylie partially parried a blow dealt upon a whig by one of Tarleton's dragoons. A friend near him shot the dragoon, and Wylie seized his sword, which he took home and afterwards gave to his son Peter, who wore it when a captain in command of his company, and a few years since carried it with him to Florida.

 

 

FC sign

The Women of the American Revolution, Vol 3, Pages 284 - 288.

 

Isabella Wylie was the daughter of Samuel Kelso, who in 1780 lived on the north side of Fishing Creek churchyard - some vestiges of the settlement remaining at the present day. Most of his children were grown at the time of the war, and took part in its scenes. Isabella heard the gun fired at Mr. Strong's house - a few hundred yards distant - on the 11th of June, and going there saw the murdered youth, and witnessed the heart-rending anguish of his mother.

The Women of the American Revolution, Vol 3, Pages 284 - 288.

 

Isabella Wylie was the daughter of Samuel Kelso, who in 1780 lived on the north side of Fishing Creek churchyard - some vestiges of the settlement remaining at the present day. Most of his children were grown at the time of the war, and took part in its scenes. Isabella heard the gun fired at Mr. Strong's house - a few hundred yards distant - on the 11th of June, and going there saw the murdered youth, and witnessed the heart-rending anguish of his mother.

 

Kelso's house was robbed of everything, and the swords he had been manufacturing were carried off. Had he been at home he would probably have been slain; but he and his two sons were in the American camp. They were engaged in most of the battles of 1780 and the following year. At Sumter's surprise young Samuel had his whiskers cut off by a bullet, and George, severely wounded, was left on the ground for dead, but crawled to a loose horse, mounted him with difficulty, and effected his escape. While Tarleton lay at White's Mills, his mother's house was plundered, and Isabella went to make complaint; but received for the stolen property nothing but curses and blows. One tory said to her sarcastically, "So, you rebels have killed all the redcoats down at Fishing Creek!" - a taunt that made his presence intolerable to her even long after the war.

 

When inquiries were made of women who had been at Camden, concerning the prisoners there, it required no great penetration to discover that the fair Isabella Kelso took a special interest in one among them; for the name of William Wylie was never uttered without a blush like the rose. This soldier, a few weeks after he obtained his liberty, was united to the beautiful maiden by the Rev. Mr. Simpson. He was the eldest son of Peter Wylie, the poet of the day, who has left a volume of unpublished verses. His home was at the Big Spring, six miles north of Chesterville. William was in military service from the commencement of hostilities; fought under Gen. Williamson, and was with Moultrie on the retreat from Black Swamp to Charleston; was in McClure's company under Col. Washington at the surprise at Monk's Corner, and did his part bravely in the succeeding battles.

 

While the whigs were at Clem's branch, he and a comrade obtained leave to visit their homes. As they lay by on their way, Wylie fast asleep on the ground while his companion was washing his shirt in the stream, he was awakened by a kick, and looking up saw a British dragoon standing over him with his sword drawn. The two prisoners were taken to Rocky Mount, whence Wylie made his escape on the morning of July 12th. He met on the road the redcoats flying from the battle at Williamson's, and shortly after his gallant captain, McClure, scouring the country in pursuit. He joined him, and was with him on his last field.

 

Being on separate duty he was not at the surprise of August 18th, but in December was sent by Col. Lacy - who had formed a camp on Turkey Creek in York district - to Morgan's camp, then at his fathers house. He was accompanied by the brave "Hopping John Miller," and on Sandy River fell in with a large tory party under the command of one Nichols. Both took to flight, but were closely pursued, and when Wylie's horse began to fag, Miller, seeing that the enemy gained on them, proposed to turn and fight. Wylie, however, saw that they were too many, and insisted on Miller's saving himself. He then dismounted and leaped over a fence, hoping to make his escape; but Nichols cleared it on horseback after him. Wylie posted himself by a tree, determined to sell his life dearly, and was about to fire on Nichols when he called to him that he should have quarter. He then threw down his gun, but would have been killed by the other tories when they came up, had not their leader thrown himself between them. They took his jaded horse, flung away the saddle, and mounted him, tying his legs and arms, and went on.

 

The first place at which they stopped was the house of William White - a thorough whig, whose wife Jane had the spirit of a Revolutionary matron. In her broad Scotch dialect, she asked - "Weel, Willie, lad, hae ye had onything to eat the day?" and when told he had not, and was very hungry - "Then ye maun tak' a bit of bread, and a wee sup o' buttermilk," she said, "till keep up your strength; for by the company ye are in I trow ye hae a long ride afore ye." "No." exclaimed one of the loyalists; "I'll be d----d if he does; we'll hang him!" On hearing this Mrs. White turned round, and poured out such eloquent denunciations against all tories and redcoats, that the men were glad to make haste and be out of the reach of her tongue.

 

At night they stopped at the dwelling of a poor family, where little was found in the way of provision. Wylie was put into a back shed, where late at night he was visited by Nichols, who crept in on his hands and knees, to give his prisoner a piece of bread and encourage him with kind words. He had not absolute control over his gang, but promised better treatment when they reached Winnsboro'. This attention Wylie long remembered, and on hearing afterwards that Nichols had been taken and hung by the libertymen, said he would have ventured his life to save him.

 

Early the next morning they reached Winnsboro'. and Wylie was taken to the quarters of Lord Cornwallis, where Tarleton was at the time. His lordship asked him many questions about the rebel army, and ordered some liquor to be given him. The prisoner drank sparingly, for he suspected the motives of such an indulgence, and was determined to give no information that could injure his friends, Cornwallis and Tarleton were walking the room, and frequently spoke together in a low tone while conducting the examination. The tory Col. Philips was standing by, and at length beckoned to Wylie, whom he knew well - having lived near his father in Ireland. When the prisoner went to him, he said in a persuasive manner - "Wiliam, gang home, bring in Frank and Jemmy, an' quit the rebels, or ye will be caught and hung, as ye ken they did McClurkie of Rocky Creek!" This advice, it need not be said, was lost upon Wylie. On the day that Tarleton marched from Winnsboro' to attack Morgan, he was sent with a guard to Camden, where he lay the greater part of the winter in jail, being liberated at the same time with McCalla.

 

 

Catherine Wylie Austin 2004

 

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Wylies go to Indiana

(by Robert Alan Wylie)

 

MWC says the growth of slavery in South Carolina caused the Wylie's to migrate to the Indiana Territory. Eli Whitney's cotton gin, patented in 1794, had a good deal to do with this. The long-staple cotton (which had been grown in India for centuries) had seeds that were easy to remove, but the short-staple cotton, which could be grown in the uplands, had seeds which were difficult to pick out. Whitney's cotton gin solved the problem and cotton growing, and slaves, moved rapidly into the Piedmont. Low county planters bought large tracts in the up country. Congress passed an Act forbidding importation of slaves after 1808, but South Carolina relaxed its restrictions and the end of 1803 and in the next four years brought in 39,075 Blacks. South Carolina became foremost in defending the slave system.

 

The prospect of new lands in Indiana, which was to become a state in 1816, must have seemed very inviting. Controversy over whether the new state was to have slavery had been going on for several years, and even after the constitution was adopted, with provisions forbidding slavery, the issue was fought through the courts.

 

MWC says the Wylie's came to Indiana before it became a state but my father said it was in 1833. Our ancestor, Samuel Wylie was born on December 8, 1780, so he must have been in his mid-20's when he left South Carolina. Who his father was, I do not know. If he was the son of Samuel (son of James), the Elder Samuel would have been 19 when he was born. William Wylie, son of Samuel, the first Hoosier, was born November 18, 1814. Samuel Wylie died on November 8, 1868 and a limestone shaft in the United Presbyterian Cemetery (now little used) in Bloomington, Indiana marks his grave. Nearby is the grave of Martha Curry, who was born in the Chester District of South Carolina and died in 1845 at the age of 69. Doubtless other pioneers from South Carolina are buried there. The Currys and the Wylies were friends and the Curry name would come up again in the Wylie history. (Charts that follow will continue to show the continuity of lineage.)

 

William's second wife, Mary Cherry, had one child who died in infancy. His third wife, Ann, had no children. It was Grandma Ann that MWC remembers as a Grandmother. She recalls her Grandfather as a kindly, rather distinguished looking gentleman with long white hair curling over his collar. He was one of the builders of the old United Presbyterian Church on North College Avenue in 1870, and a staunch layman.

 

Carson Wylie's mother died when he was in the teens and he was cared for by his Aunt Meg, who later married Frank Fee. Carson died at the age of 49 when MWC was 15 years old. They were then living on her grandfather's farm on the east side of what is now Rogers Street, some three miles south of the Bloomington Court House Square. Her uncle Mack Wylie had a farm across the road, where the Country Club is now located. She remembers Uncle Mack as a "hale fellow well met, always with a smile on his face." She adored her father and used to say, "there were only 3 men in the world whom I truly loved -- Father, Uncle Mack Wylie and Uncle Frank Fee."

 

John Wylie, my grandfather, married Catherine Voss and they had 5 children that lived: Grace, William Henry (my father), Charles, Allan and Ruth.

 

Charles was about MWC's age and he used to ride out to the farm on a bicycle to spend weekends, and they became devoted friends as well as cousins. Some 30 years later, after Charles' wife Etta died, they renewed their friendship, decided to marry. They got a special dispensation from the Chruch to do so, but Charles became ill and died before that happened. A number of years later, in 1953, Mable was married to W.S. Curry by my father, Rev. William Wylie, who was a first cousin and old friend. My recollection of Bill Curry dates to about the Fall of 1917 when my family moved to Bloomington, arriving in our first car, an overland touring car, after a grueling trip from Jeffersonville, with an overnight stop in Paoli. Bill Curry had the Buick-Overland Agency on North College Avenue in a former livery stable, as were many auto dealers in those days.

 

Mable Wylie was my homeroom teacher, probably when I was in 8-B in junior high school, located in what was Indiana University's first building, a red brick building with limestone neo-gothic arches, which stood at the south end of College Avenue. I remember her as having quiet dignity, a crisp but warm way of talking, firm but never raising her voice. She was as attractive as a 13 year old boy was capable of discerning, with brownish hair, just this side of copper. I wish now that I had gotten to know her better, but that was not possible for a boy at the savage stage when he had a horror of washing his face and combing his hair. I shunned acknowledgement of cousinship that might be suspected by others as constituting a teacher's pet relationship. She also taught me, or tried to teach me, arithmetic. It may have been in her class, though I don't think so, that when we took up the subject of mensuration I got it confused with menstruation, a mysterious word that a boy shouldn't utter in the schoolroom. Why didn't the idiot educators who wrote books just call it measuring?

 

But I digress. I need to go back to Great Grandfather Wylie's farm. I was never there, but the square red brick house was pointed out to me by Father many times. (I regret to say that when I was about 18, I considered buying an oil painting of the house by a local artist for $10, and then decided not to.) In his later years, William Wylie moved to town and turned the farm over to Carson. When Carson died, their sons, Frank and 7 year old, Presley undertook to run it. Mable, his daughter, finished high school and started teaching in the county schools when she was 18, smaller than some of the hulking boys in her class. She had to discover how to deal with obstreperous students. She later went to Indiana University to summer sessions at State Teachers College in Terre Haute and at Columbia University. After four years in the county schools, she spent the rest of her teaching career in Bloomington High School.

 

The William Wylie Farm was sold when Frank Wylie moved to Washington State to go into apple growing. Then his mother married a neighbor, Aaron Gordon. Mable writes: "He loved me as though I were his own daughter and lavished everything on me. He bought me one of the first buick cars that came to Monroe County back in 1916. He was considered wealthy in those days and could afford it."  He was the only son of Sammy Gordon, who owned a lot of land and had the only underground railroad for slaves in our part of the country. Mable discovered years later that Aaron Gordon's mother was Margaret Curry, sister of William Wylie's first wife.

 

Except for Mable, the only Wylie I remember in Bloomington, outside our own family was Samuel O. Wylie, son of Samuel's son John, and cousin of my Grandfather John. He had a brother, Lew Wylie, and a sister, Emma Taylor. His daughter, Martha Wylie, spent most of her life in China as a missionary, and when she had to leave China she became head of the Nursing School at Berea College in Kentucky. She was in her 80's when she died in 1976. She was buried in Bloomington.

 

John Harper Wylie (my Grandfather) was born on September 26, 1846 and grew up on his father's farm. He enlisted in the Union Army at the age of 18 but so far as I know, did not get into the fighting. The only thing that I remember he told me about the Civil War, is that to enlist he had to bite a bullet to prove that his teeth were strong. He returned from the war to live on the farm until he was 21. The next year, on his 22nd birthday, was married to Catherine Nancy Voss then 20. He had attended college for a while, presumably Indiana University, worked as a painter and went into the retail furniture business.

 

 

Catherine Wylie Austin 2004

 

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A Letter From Hannah Wylie

 

Aunt Hannah Wylie, a spinster born in 1821 and died in 1882, was one of the 12 children of Peter I and Annie Evans. She started a "Wylie history, as she recalled from her father and other kinfolk," in June 1860.

 

Dear relatives,

 

I have often thought of writing a history of our family as far as I can trace back, thinking that there might be some, who may at some future date, feel enough interest to read over. Perhaps when I am laid with those who have gone before me; yet at times I feel as if it would be a labor lost.

 

There is such selfishness, vanity and false pride in the world and I fear too much in our family. I am afraid the high-minded, honorable, and truthful principles that marked the character of our ancestors is not respected as it should be.

 

I will have to write as I recall things to my memory so you will not find much order.

 

My great-grandfather, Peter Wylie I, married Annie Hawthorne. They came for Ireland, County Antrim. They with the Kelsos (later called Kelsey) and Mills came over in the same vessel not long before the Revolutionary War. Originally, they were from Scotland but went to Ireland during the persecution of the Covenenters."

 

Peter Wylie I had three sons and one daughter, namely, Francis, William (my grandfather), James and Margaret.They were good WHIGS during the revolution. Peter Wylie I was a Covenenter, read mostly religious books and he also wrote some. There is a manuscript still exists, some rhyme and I also think he wrote some on the scriptures. I have heard my father say he remembered seeing him. He was a small man and very old. Father did not remember his grandmother, she having died before his time.

 

My great-grandfather Kelsey married a Mills. They all came here at the same time. I don't know the number of children they had, but I think they had a large family. They were also good WHIGS during the Revolution. My grandfather William Wylie entered the army when very young. He was taken prisoner twice during the War. Once he lay in jail in Winnsboro and another time chained to the floor for attempting to escape. There was only one blanket for two prisoners. One of the times a Tory (Nickles) took him prisoner, a few miles below Chester. He was married shortly after the war to my grandmother, Isabella Kelso (Kelsey).

 

My grandfather William was a very cheerfully disposed man. My grandmother was of a melancholy temperament, very religious. Her health was delicate, being troubled with asthma. I think she looked at the dark side of the picture. Grandfather was inclined to drink at public places, which caused her much uneasiness. He was always extremely kind to her and indulgent to his family. My father remember them with deep respect, and the most tender affection for his mother.

 

My grandfather's bothers and sisters were high-minded, and and had great respect for truth. I have heard Pa say that he believed old Uncle Jimmy Wylie would have offered his right arm to be cut off rather than to tell a lie, and I have often heard him speak of Aunt Margaret saying, "if you can say nae guid of a person, say nothing." She married a Boyd, not a very high minded family. (Aunt Hannah evidently didn't subscribe to Aunt Margaret's philosophy of saying "guid.")

 

In Aunt Hannah's notes, she recounts many atrocities, indecencies and thievery by the Tories, and of many brave deeds of the women left behind while their husbands were off fighting the Tories.

 

The following entries in Book L, Numbers 462 through 468 were listed showing Wylie service performed in the Revolutionary cause.

 

  • John Willey - 16 pounds, 2 shillings and 10 pence fathering sterling for 113 days militia duty in 1781.
  • John Wylie - 3 pounds, 7 shillings and a penny half penny sterling for 47 days militia duty.
  • Samuel Wiley - 33 pounds, 14 shillings and 3 pence farthing sterling for 236 days militia duty in 1780.
  • William Wiley - 9 pounds, 5 shillings and 8 pence half penny sterling for sundries for militia use in 1781 and 1782.
  • William Wyly - 11 pounds, 14 shilling, 3 pence farthing sterling for sundries for militia use in 1781.
  • Peter Wylie - 1 pound, 8 shillings and 6 pence, 3 farthing sterling for forage for Continental use.
  • Francis Wylie - 44 pounds, 2 shillings and 10 pence farthing sterling for 317 days militia duty.

I don't think this leaves much doubt that the Wylies (no matter how it was spelled) were in complete sympathy and acted accordingly in the Revolutionary cause of their newly adopted country. The Chester County library has plenty of information to prove Wylie eligibility for membership in the D.A.R. (if anyone should care)

 

 

Catherine Wylie Austin 2004

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The Wylie Tartan



wylie tartan

The Wylie Tartan was registered by The Honorable, Seymour Bruce Wylie, QS, CD, A Noble In - The Noblesse Of Scotland, 9th Duine-uasail Macfarlane - of that Ilk, 13th Duine-uasail Wylie - of Lothian Burnett's & Struth Scottish Ragalia Ltd.


Ms. Margaret Struth - Proprietor
61 Patterson Road
Barrie, Ontario, L4N-3V9 Canada
Phone: (705) 728-3232
Fax: (705) 728-2962

 

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Wylie

Adam b.1683 - Larne, Scotland
Adam b.1709 - Ballymena, Northern Ireland, Antrim Co.
Allan James b.1882 -
Andrew -
Andrew b.1789 - Washington, PA
Barbara Elizabeth b.1952 - Havre de Grace, MD
Betsy -
Bianca Esperanza
Carson -
Catherine b.1815 - Chester Co, SC
Catherine Louise
Charles -
Charles Alan
David
David b.1720 - Maylarg, Antrim Co, Ireland
DeKalb b.1813 -
Dixon H. d.1851 -
Doc Dickson -
Elizabeth b.1725 - Maylarg, Antrim Co, Ireland
Elizabeth -
Emily Jane b.1912 - Bloomington, IN
Emma
Francis b.1750 - Ireland
Francis b.1781 - Chester Co, SC
Francis b.1818 - Chester Co, SC
Frank
Grace d.1943 -
Green Lee -
Hanes b.1777 - Chester Co, SC
Hannah b.1821 -
Helen Voss b.1915 - Bloomington, IN
Isabella -
James b.1749 - Antrim Co., Ireland
James b.1822 - Chester Co, SC
James -
James Washington
Jane b.1816 - Chester Co, SC
Jean b.1731 - Maylarg, Antrim Co, Ireland
John -
John b.1713 - Maylarg, Antrim Co, Ireland
John b.1708 - Scotland
John Harper b.1846 - Moorseville, Morgan Co, IN
Joseph b.1782 - Chester Co, SC
Joseph b.1820 - Chester Co, SC
Lawrence -
Lewis J.
Lillie Ann b.1830 - Chester Co, SC
Lilly b.1783 - Chester Co, SC
Mable b.1883 -
Margaret
Margaret b.1747 - Ireland
Margaret b.1723 - Maylarg, Antrim Co, Ireland
Margaret -
Margaret b.1825 - Chester Co, SC
Marian Grace b.1907 -
Martha A. d.1851 -
Mary
Mary b.1754 - Antrim Co., Ireland
Mary -
Molly -
Nancy b.1827 - Chester Co, SC
Peter b.1785 - Chester Co. SC
Peter b.1711 - Scotland
Peter Kelso b.1781 -
Peter Kelso b.1849 -
Peter Ross b.1849 -
Presley
Richard -
Robert Alan
Rosanna b.1715 - Maylarg, Antrim Co, Ireland
Ruth -
Sally -
Samuel b.1780 - Chester Co. SC
Samuel b.1717 - Maylarg, Antrim Co, Ireland
Samuel Brown b.1729 - Maylarg, Antrim Co, Ireland
Samuel Kelso b.1793 - NC
Samuel Mack -
Samuel O.
Sarah -
Sarah -
Virginia Annis
William b.1814 - Chester Co. SC
William b.1758 - Antrim Co., Ireland
William H. d.1954 -


Surname List

 

Catherine Wylie Austin 2004

 

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